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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 16 0 Browse Search
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T. Maccius Plautus, Stichus, or The Parasite Rebuffed (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 6 0 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
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Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Ambracia (Greece) or search for Ambracia (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1303a (search)
ign offices, as at OreusIn Euboea; its secession from Sparta to Athens, 377 B.C., was perhaps the occasion of this revolution. oligarchy was broken up when Heracleodorus became one of the magistrates, who in place of an oligarchyformed a constitutional government, or rather a democracy. Another cause is alteration by small stages; by this I mean that often a great change of institutions takes place unnoticed when people overlook a small alteration, as in Ambracia the property-qualification was small, and finally men hold office with none at all, as a little is near to nothing, or practically the same. Also difference of race is a cause of faction, until harmony of spirit is reached; for just as any chance multitude of people does not form a state, so a state is not formed in any chance period of time. Hence most of the states that have hitherto admitted joint settlers or additional settlersi.e. colonists not from
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1304a (search)
democracy stronger; and at Argos the notables having risen in repute in connection with the battle against the Spartans at Mantinea took in hand to put down the people; and at Syracuse the people having been the cause of the victory in the war against Athens made a revolution from constitutional government to democracy; and at Chalcis the people with the aid of the notables overthrew the tyrant PhoxusUnknown. and then immediately seized the government; and again at Ambracia similarly the people joined with the adversaries of the tyrant Periander in expelling him and then brought the government round to themselves.580 B.C; cf. 1311a 39 ff. And indeed in general it must not escape notice that the persons who have caused a state to win power, whether private citizens or magistrates or tribes, or in general a section or group of any kind, stir up faction; for either those who envy these men for being honored begin the faction, or
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1311a (search)
the cause is the seizure of private property. Also the objects aimed at by the revolutionaries in the case both of tyrannies and of royal governments are the same as in revolts against constitutional government; for monarchs possess great wealth and great honor, which are desired by all men. And in some cases the attack is aimed at the person of the rulers, in others at their office. Risings provoked by insolence are aimed against the person; and though insolence has many varieties, each of them gives rise to anger, and when men are angry they mostly attack for the sake of revenge, not of ambition. For example the attack on the Pisistratidae took place because they outraged Harmodius's sister and treated Harmodius with contumely (for Harmodius attacked them because of his sister and Aristogiton because of Harmodius, and also the plot was laid against Periander the tyrant in AmbraciaSee 1304a 31 n. because when drinkin