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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 70 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 30 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 26 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 14 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 14 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Amphipolis (Greece) or search for Amphipolis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1303b (search)
conferred citizenship on their foreign troops and mercenaries and then faction set in and they came to battle; and the Amphipolitans having received settlers from Chalcis were most of them driven out by them.Cf. 1306a 2. The exact circumstances are unknown; Amphipolis was colonized from Athens 437 B.C. (And in oligarchies civil strife is raised by the many, on the ground that they are treated unjustly because they are not admitted to an equal share although they are equal, as has been said before, but in democracies it begins with the notables, because they have an equal share although they are not equal.)This sentence is out of place here, and would fit in better if placed (as it is by Newman) above at 1301a 39, after stasia/zousi, or (with other editors) 1301b 26. Also states sometimes enter on faction for geographical reasons, when the nature of the country is not suited for there being a sing
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1306a (search)
(as Hipparinus put forward DionysiusSee 1259a 29 n. at Syracuse, and at AmphipolisSee 1303b 2 n. a man named Cleotimus led the additional settlers that came from Chalcis and on their arrival stirred them up to sedition against the wealthy, and in Aegina the man who carried out the transactions with Chares attempted to cause a revolution in the constitution for a reason of this sorti.e. he had squandered his fortune in riotous living; this deal with the Athenian general may have been in 367 B.C.); so sometimes they attempt at once to introduce some reform, at other times they rob the public funds and in consequence either they or those who fight against them in their peculations stir up faction against the government, as happened at Apollonia on the Black Sea. On the other hand, harmonious oligarchy does not easily cause its own destruction; and an indication of this is the constitutional government at Pharsalus, for th