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Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.). You can also browse the collection for Anthedon or search for Anthedon in all documents.

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Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 86 (search)
Now it happened that there was a battle between him and Ptolemy, who was called Lathyrus, who had taken the city Asochis. He indeed slew a great many of his enemies, but the victory rather inclined to Ptolemy. But when this Ptolemy was pursued by his mother Cleopatra, and retired into Egypt, Alexander besieged Gadara, and took it; as also he did Amathus, which was the strongest of all the fortresses that were about Jordan, and therein were the most precious of all the possessions of Theodorus, the son of Zeno. Whereupon Theodopus marched against him, and took what belonged to himself as well as the king's baggage, and slew ten thousand of the Jews. However, Alexander recovered this blow, and turned his force towards the maritime parts, and took Raphia and Gaza, with Anthedon also, which was afterwards called Agrippias by king Herod.
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 164 (search)
Now when Gabinius was come to Alexandrium, because he found a great many there en-camped, he tried, by promising them pardon for their former offenses, to induce them to come over to him before it came to a fight; but when they would hearken to no terms of accommodation, he slew a great number of them, and shut up a great number of them in the citadel. Now Marcus Antonius, their leader, signalized himself in this battle, who, as he always showed great courage, so did he never show it so much as now; but Gabinius, leaving forces to take the citadel, went away himself, and settled the cities that had not been demolished, and rebuilt those that had been destroyed. Accordingly, upon his injunctions, the following cities were restored: Scythopolis, and Samaria, and Anthedon, and Apollonia, and Jamnia, and Raphia, and Mariassa, and Adoreus, and Gamala, and Ashdod, and many others; while a great number of men readily ran to each of them, and became their inhabitants.