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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 256 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 160 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 80 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 74 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 64 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 54 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 54 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 36 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.). You can also browse the collection for Argos (Greece) or search for Argos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 1 (search)
dead and to the spirit of his father; (2) as administrator of the powers committed to him by his father, Zeus the Saviour. Some prefer to take patrw=| not as patrw=|a but as patrw=|e i.e.“god of my fahters.” prove yourself my savior and ally, I entreat you, now that I have come to this land and returned from exile. On this mounded grave I cry out to my father to hearken, to hear me [Look, I bring] a lock to InachusOrestes offers a lock of his hair to do honour to Inachus, the river-god of Argos, because rivers were worshipped as givers of life. in requital for his care, and here, a second, in token of my grief. For I was not present, father, to lament your death, nor did I stretch forth my hand to bear your corpse. What is this I see? What is this throng of women that moves in state, marked by their sable cloaks? To what calamity should I set this down? Is it some new sorrow that befalls our house? Or am I right to suppose that for my father's sake they bear these libations to
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 653 (search)
st faces. But if there is another matter requiring graver counsel, that is the concern of men, and we will communicate with them. Orestes I am a stranger, a Daulian of the Phocians. As I was on my way, carrying my pack on business of my own to Argos,just as I ended my journey here,Literally “I have been unyoked,” his feet being his horses. a man, a stranger to me as I to him, fell in with me, and inquired about my destination and told me his. He was Strophius, a Phocian (for as we talked I learned his name), and he said to me, “Stranger, since in any case you are bound for Argos,keep my message in mind most faithfully and tell his parents Orestes is dead, and by no means let it escape you. Whether his friends decide to bring him home or to bury him in the land of his sojourn, a foreigner utterly forever, convey their wishes back to me.In the meantime a bronze urn contains the ashes of a man rightly lamented.” This much I tell you as I heard it. Whether by any chance I am
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 1021 (search)
arth,the precinct of Loxias, and to the bright fire said to be imperishable.In the Delphic shrine there was an undying fire. To no other hearth did Loxias bid me turn. And as to the manner in which this evil deed was wrought, I charge all men of Argos in time to come to bear me witness.I go forth a wanderer, estranged from this land, leaving this repute behind, in life or death. Chorus And you have done well. Therefore do not yoke your tongue to an ill-omened speech, nor let your lips give vss.I go forth a wanderer, estranged from this land, leaving this repute behind, in life or death. Chorus And you have done well. Therefore do not yoke your tongue to an ill-omened speech, nor let your lips give vent to evil forebodings,since you have freed the whole realm of Argos by lopping off the heads of two serpents with a fortunate stroke. Orestes Ah, ah! You handmaidens, look at them there: like Gorgons, wrapped in sable garments, entwined with swarming snakes! I can stay no longer.