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Pausanias, Description of Greece 256 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 160 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 80 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 74 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 64 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 54 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 54 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 36 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Argos (Greece) or search for Argos (Greece) in all documents.

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Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 7 For Diagoras of Rhodes Boxing-Match 464 B. C. (search)
father's land, and their dwelling-places were named after them. There it is that a sweet recompense for his pitiful misfortune is established for Tlepolemus, the first leader of the Tirynthians, as for a god:a procession of flocks for burnt sacrifice and the trial of contests. With the flowers from these Diagoras has had himself crowned twice, and at the renowned Isthmus four times, in his good fortune, and again and again at Nemea and in rocky Athens; and the prizes of the bronze shield in Argos and the works of art in Arcadia and Thebes are familiar with him, and the duly ordered contestsof the Boeotians, and Pellana and Aegina, where he was six times victor. And in Megara the list carved in stone gives no other account. But, Father Zeus, you who rule over the ridges of Atabyrium, grant honor to the hymn ordained in praise of an Olympian victor, and to the man who has found excellence as a boxer, and grant to him honored gracein the eyes of both citizens and strangers. For he walks
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. (search)
of the greatest god, and the hero rejoiced to see his adopted son, and gave him the same name as his mother's father, Opus,a man beyond words in beauty and fine deeds. Locrus gave him a city and a people to govern, and strangers came to him from Argos and Thebes, from Arcadia and Pisa. But among the settlers he chiefly honored the son of Actorand Aegina, Menoetius, whose son went with the Atreidae to the plain of Teuthras, and stood alone beside Achilles, when Telephus turned to flight the mig, I went to honor the Isthmian crowning of Lampromachus, when both he and Epharmostus were victors on a single day. And then there were two other joyous victories at the gates of Corinth, and others won by Epharmostus in the vale of Nemea; and at Argos he won glory in a contest of men, and as a boy at Athens. And at Marathon, when he was barred from competing with the beardless youths,how he endured the contest for silver cups among the older men! Having subdued those men by the trick of quickl
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 13 For Xenophon of Corinth Foot Race and Pentathlon 464 B. C. (search)
h,the sweet-tongued cry of the noble herald, who announced their victories sixty times at both places, will confirm my words. Their victories at Olympia seem to have already been mentioned; and of those in the future I could tell clearly when the time comes. For now I am hopeful, although a god controlsthe outcome. If the good fortune of their family continues, we shall leave this to Zeus and Enyalius to accomplish. They won six times beneath the brow of Parnassus; and all their victories in Argos and in Thebes, and all that shall be witnessed by the royal Lycaean altar that rules over the Arcadians, and by Pellana, and Sicyon, and Megara, the beautifully enclosed precinct of the Aeacidae,and Eleusis and splendid Marathon, and the wealthy and beautiful cities beneath the high crest of Aetna, and Euboea—you may search through all Greece, and you will find that their victories are more than the eye can see. Come, swim away with agile feet!Zeus the Accomplisher, grant reverence, and a sw
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 5 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
s voice from across the sea.And Apollo, the first leader, doomed the beasts to dread fear, so that his oracles to the guardian of Cyrene would not go unfulfilled. It is Apollo who dispenses remedies to men and women for grievous diseases,and who bestowed on us the cithara, and gives the Muses' inspiration to whomever he will, bringing peaceful concord into the mind, and who possesses the oracular shrine; wherefore he settled the mighty descendants of Heracles and Aegimius in Lacedaemonand in Argos and in sacred Pylos. But it is my part to sing of the lovely glory that comes from Sparta, where the Aegeidae were born, and from therethey went to Thera, my ancestors, not without the gods; they were led by a certain fate. From there we have received the feast with its many sacrifices, and at yourbanquet, Carneian Apollo, we honor the well-built city of Cyrene, which is held by foreigners who delight in bronze, the Trojan descendants of Antenor. For they came with Helen, after they had seen
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 8 For Aristomenes of Aegina Wrestling 446 B. C. (search)
machus at the Isthmus. And by exalting the clan of the Midylids, you fulfill the prophecy which once Amphiaraus the son of Oicles spoke in riddling words, when he saw, in seven-gatedThebes, those sons standing by their spears, when they came from Argos on that second march, the Epigoni. Thus he spoke, while they were fighting: “By nature the genuine spirit of the fathersis conspicuous in the sons. I clearly see Alcmaeon, wielding a dappled serpent on his blazing shield, the first at the gates othe tidings of a betterbird of omen. But at home his luck will be the opposite. For he alone of the Danaan army will gather the bones of his dead son, by the fortune sent from the gods, and come with his people unharmed to the spacious streets of Argos, the city of Abas.” So spoke Amphiaraus. And I myself rejoice as I fling garlands over Alcmaeon and sprinkle him with song, because this hero is my neighbor and guardian of my possessions, and he met me when I was going to the songful navel of th
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 9 For Telesicrates of Cyrene Hoplite Race 474 B. C. (search)
or song, someone exacts an unpaid debt from me, to awake againthe ancient glory of his ancestors as well: for the sake of a Libyan woman they went to the city of Irasa, as suitors of the very famous daughter of Antaeus with the beautiful hair. Many excellent kinsmen sought her, and many strangers too, since her beauty was marvellous. They wantedto pluck the flowering fruit of golden-crowned Youth. But her father, cultivating for his daughter a more renowned marriage, heard how Danaus once in Argos had found for his forty-eight daughters, before noon overtook them, a very swift marriage. For right away he stood the whole band of suitors at the end of a course,and told them to decide with a footrace which of the heroes, who came to be bridegrooms, would take which bride. The Libyan too made such an offer in joining his daughter with a husband. He placed her at the goal, when he had arrayed her as the crowning prize, and in their midst he announced that that man should lead her to his ho
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 9 For Chromius of Aetna Chariot Race ?474 B. C. (search)
asting. But we will wake the shouting lyre and the flute in honor of the very pinnacle of horse-contests, which Adrastus established for Phoebus by the streams of the Asopus.Having mentioned them, I will adorn that hero with glorious honors, who, at the time when he was ruler there, made his city famous and glorious with new festivals, and contests of men's strength, and hollow chariots. For once Adrastus fled from bold-thinking Amphiaraus and terrible civil strife, from his ancestral home, Argos; and the sons of Talaus were no longer rulers, overpowered by sedition.A stronger man puts an end to the previous justice. The sons of Talaus gave man-conquering Eriphyle, as a faithful pledge, in marriage to Amphiaraus son of Oicles, and became the most powerful of the golden-haired Danaans; and once they led a noble army of men to seven-gated Thebes—an expedition not attended by birds of good omen. In their mad desire to leave home, the son of Cronus, by whirling his lightning-bolt, urged
Pindar, Isthmean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Isthmian 5 For Phylacidas of Aegina Pancratium ?478 B. C. (search)
to the clear road of god-given deeds, then do not grudgeto mix for her in song a boast that is fitting recompense for toils. In heroic times, too, fine warriors gained fame, and they are celebrated with lyres and flutes in full-voiced harmonies for time beyond reckoning. Heroes who are honored by the grace of Zeus provide a theme for skilled poets:among the Aetolians the brave sons of Oeneus are worshipped with shining sacrifices; in Thebes the horseman Iolaus has his honor, and Perseus in Argos, and the spearman Castor together with Polydeuces by the streams of Eurotas. But in Oenone the honors belong to the great-hearted spiritsof Aeacus and his sons. Twice in battles they sacked the city of the Trojans: the first time following Heracles, the second time the sons of Atreus. Now, drive me into the air! Tell me, who killed Cycnus, and who Hector,and the fearless commander of the Ethiopians, bronze-armed Memnon? Who wounded noble Telephus with his spear by the banks of Caïcus? Men wh