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M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 4 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Aricia (Italy) or search for Aricia (Italy) in all documents.

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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 3, line 84 (search)
Now Anxur's hold was passed, the oozy road That separates the marsh, the grove sublime Near Aricia. (See Book VI., 93.) Where reigns the Scythian goddess, and the path By which men bear the fasces to the feast On Alba's summit. From the height afar- Gazing in awe upon the walls of Rome His native city, since the Northern war Unseen, unvisited-thus Caesar spake: 'Seat of the gods, have men deserted thee, 'Thee, Rome, without a blow? Then for what town 'Shall men do battle? Thank the gods, no host 'From Eastern climes has sought Italia's shores 'To wreak its fury; nor Sarmatian horde 'With northern tribes conjoined; by Fortune's gift 'This war is civil: else this coward chief 'Had been thy ruin.' Trembling at his feet He found the city: deadly fire and flame, As from a conqueror; gods and fanes dispersed; Such was the measure of their fear, as though His power and wish were one. No festal shout Greeted his march, no feigned acclaim of joy. Scarce had they time for hate. In Phoebus' hal
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 6, line 1 (search)
ize on posts of vantage in the plain; Thus forcing Caesar to extend his troops On wider lines; and holding for his own Such space encompassed as divides from Rome Aricia,Aricia was situated on the Via Appia, about sixteen miles from Rome. There was a temple of Diana close to it, among some woods on a small lake. Aricia was HoraceAricia was situated on the Via Appia, about sixteen miles from Rome. There was a temple of Diana close to it, among some woods on a small lake. Aricia was Horace's first halting place on his journey to Brundisium sacred to that goddess chaste Of old Mycenae; or as Tiber holds From Rome's high ramparts to the Tuscan sea, Unless he deviate. No trumpet call Commands an onset, and the darts that fly Fly though forbidden; but the arm that flings For proof the lance, at random, here and there Aricia was Horace's first halting place on his journey to Brundisium sacred to that goddess chaste Of old Mycenae; or as Tiber holds From Rome's high ramparts to the Tuscan sea, Unless he deviate. No trumpet call Commands an onset, and the darts that fly Fly though forbidden; but the arm that flings For proof the lance, at random, here and there Deals impious slaughter. Weighty care compelled Each leader to withhold his troops from fight; For there the weary earth of produce failed Pressed by Pompeius' steeds, whose horny hoofs Rang in their gallop on the grassy fields And killed the succulence. They strengthless lay Upon the mown expanse, nor pile of straw, Brought from