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Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Aspledon or search for Aspledon in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Boeotia, chapter 38 (search)
y favour in the passage of Homer where Achilles replies to the envoys from Agamemnon:—Not even the wealth that comes to Orchomenus,Hom. Il. 9.381a line that clearly shows that even then the revenues coming to Orchomenus were large. They say that Aspledon was left by the inhabitants because of a shortage of water. They say also that the city got its name from Aspledon, who was a son of the nymph Mideia and Poseidon. Their view is confirmed by some verses composed by Chersias, a man of Orchomenus: its name from Aspledon, who was a son of the nymph Mideia and Poseidon. Their view is confirmed by some verses composed by Chersias, a man of Orchomenus:—To Poseidon and glorious MideiaWas born Aspledon in the spacious city.Chersias of Orchomenus, unknown location. The poem of Chersias was no longer extant in my day, but these verses are quoted by Callippus in the same history of Orchomenus. The Orchomenians have a tradition that this Chersias wrote also the inscription on the grave of Hesi
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Boeotia, chapter 39 (search)
On the side towards the mountains the boundary of Orchomenus is Phocis, but on the plain it is Lebadeia. Originally this city stood on high ground, and was called Mideia after the mother of Aspledon. But when Lebadus came to it from Athens, the inhabitants went down to the low ground, and the city was named Lebadeia after him. Who was the father of Lebadus, and why he came, they do not know; they know only that the wife of Lebadus was Laonice. The city is no less adorned than the most prosperous of the Greek cities, and it is separated from the grove of Trophonius by the river Hercyna. They say that here Hercyna, when playing with the Maid, the daughter of Demeter, held a goose which against her will she let loose. The bird flew into a hollow cave and hid under a stone; the Maid entered and took the bird as it lay under the stone. The water flowed, they say, from the place where the Maid took up the stone, and hence the river received the name of Hercyna. On the bank of the river there