hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 762 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 376 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 356 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 296 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 228 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 222 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Exordia (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 178 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 158 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 138 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 122 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 7 document sections:

Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 3, chapter 1 (search)
so he said, as worth more to him than was his native state. After reading Proxenus' letter Xenophon conferred with Socrates,The philosopher, whose follower and friend Xenophon had been from his youth. the Athenian, about the proposed journey; and Socrates, suspecting that his becoming a friend of Cyrus might be a cause for accusation against Xenophon on the part of the Athenian government, for the reason that Cyrus was thought to have given the Lacedaemonians zealous aid in their war against Athens,See Introd., pp. 231-233. advised Xenophon to go to Delphi and consult the god in regard to this journey. So Xenophon went and asked Apollo to what one of the gods he should sacrifice and pray in order best and most successfully to perform the journey which he had in mind and, after meeting with good fortune, to return home in safety; and Apollo in his response told him to what gods he must sacrifice. When Xenophon came back from Delphi, he reported the oracle to Socrates; and upon hearing a
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
the heights, guarding the entrance; therefore Cyrus remained for a day in the plain. On the following day, however, a messenger came with word that Syennesis had abandoned the heights, because he had learned that Menon's army was already in Cilicia, on his own side of the mountains, and because, further, he was getting reports that triremes belonging to the LacedaemoniansCyrus had asked the Lacedaemonians “to show themselves as good friends to him as he had been to them in their war against Athens” (Xen. Hell. 2.1.1). The aid they now rendered (see also Xen. Anab. 1.4.2-3) was in response to that request. and to Cyrus himself were sailing around from Ionia to Cilicia under the command of Tamos. At any ratei.e. whether or not the reasons just given were the true ones. Cyrus climbed the mountains without meeting any opposition, and saw the camp where the Cilicians had been keeping guard. Thence he descended to a large and beautiful plain, well-watered and full of trees of all sorts and
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 3, chapter 2 (search)
air to assume that the gods are their foes and our allies—and the gods are able speedily to make the strong weak and, when they so will, easily to deliver the weak, even though they be in dire perils. Secondly, I would remind you of the perils of our own forefathers, to show you not only that it is your right to be brave men, but that brave men are delivered, with the help of the gods, even out of most dreadful dangers. For when the Persians and their followers came with a vast array to blot Athens out of existence, the Athenians dared, unaided, to withstand them, and won the victory.In the battle of Marathon, 490 B.C. And while they had vowed to Artemis that for every man they might slay of the enemy they would sacrifice a goat to the goddess, they were unable to find goats enough;According to Herodotus (Hdt. 6.117) the Persian dead numbered 6,400. so they resolved to offer five hundred every year, and this sacrifice they are paying even to this day. Again, when Xerxes at a later
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 5 (search)
o buy any except in the LydianThe Lydians were notorious as hucksters. market attached to the barbarian army of Cyrus,See Xen. Anab. 1.2.18 and the note thereon, and Xen. Anab. 1.3.14. at the price of four sigli for a capith of wheat flour or barley meal. The siglus is worth seven and one-half Attic obols, and the capith had the capacity of two Attic choenices.The obol = about 1 1/2d. or 3 cents. The choenix = about 1 quart. The prices stated were, roughly, about fifty times normal prices at Athens. The soldiers therefore managed to subsist by eating meat.The Greeks of Xenophon's time ate comparatively little meat under any circumstances, but in the Arabian desert a diet of meat constituted a real hardship. And Cyrus sometimes made these stages through the desert very long, whenever he wanted to reach water or fresh fodder.Once in particular, when they came upon a narrow, muddy place which was hard for the wagons to get through, Cyrus halted with his train of nobles and dignitaries and
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 7 (search)
proceeded to sell it; and they incurred a great deal of blame. As for Xenophon, he would not go near them, but it was plain that he was making preparations for his homeward journey; for not yet had sentence of exile been pronounced against him at Athens.The precise date of Xenophon's banishment is uncertain. It appears to have resulted not only from his participation in the expedition of Cyrus, who had been an ally of the Spartans against Athens (see Xen. Anab. 3.1.5), but from his close associard journey; for not yet had sentence of exile been pronounced against him at Athens.The precise date of Xenophon's banishment is uncertain. It appears to have resulted not only from his participation in the expedition of Cyrus, who had been an ally of the Spartans against Athens (see Xen. Anab. 3.1.5), but from his close association with Spartans thereafter. His friends in the camp, however, came to him and begged him not to depart until he should lead the army away and turn it over to Thibron.
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 4, chapter 8 (search)
eks came up, they began felling them in their haste to get out of the place as speedily as possible. But the Macronians, armed with wicker shields and lances and hair tunics, were drawn up in line of battle opposite the place where the Greeks must cross, and they were cheering one another on and throwing stones, which fell into the stream; for they never reached the Greeks or did them any harm. At this moment one of the peltasts came up to Xenophon, a man who said that he had been a slave at Athens, with word that he knew the language of these people; “I think,” he went on, “that this is my native country, and if there is nothing to hinder, I should like to have a talk with them.” “Well, there is nothing to hinder,” said Xenophon; “so talk with them, and learn, to begin with, who they are.” In reply to his inquiry they said, “Macronians.” “Well, then,” said Xenophon, “ask them why they are arrayed against us and want to be our enemies.” They replied, “Because you
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 8 (search)
From there they sailed across to Lampsacus, where Xenophon was met by Eucleides, the Phliasian seer, son of the Cleagoras who painted the mural paintings in the Lyceum.The famous gymnasium at Athens. Eucleides congratulated Xenophon upon his safe return, and asked him how much gold he had got. He replied, swearing to the truth of his statement, that he would not have even enough money to pay his travelling expenses on the way home unless he should sell his horse and what he had about his person. And Eucleides would not believe him. But when the Lampsacenes sent gifts of hospitality to Xenophon and he was sacrificing to Apollo, he gave Eucleides a place beside him; and when Eucleides saw the vitals of the victims, he said that he well believed that Xenophon had no money. “But I am sure,” he went on, “that even if money should ever be about to come to you, some obstacle always appears—if nothing else, your own self.” In this Xenophon agreed with him. Then Eucleides said, “Yes, Zeus