hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Polybius, Histories 70 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 42 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 24 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 20 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 18 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 8 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 6 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Byzantium (Turkey) or search for Byzantium (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

M. Tullius Cicero, On his House (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 20 (search)
s with the bill which you carried against me expressly by name? It is just the same thing that you did when you also carried these different enactments in one law,—one, that the king of Cyprus, whose ancestors had always been allies and friends to this nation, should have all his goods sold by the public crier, and the other, that the exiles should be brought back to Byzantium. “Oh,” says he, “I employed the same person on both those matters.” What? Suppose you had given the same man a commission to get you an Asiatic coin in Asia, and from thence to proceed into Spain; and given him leave, after he had departed from Rome, to stand for the consulship, and, after he was made consul, to obtain Syria for his province
M. Tullius Cicero, For Sestius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 26 (search)
ceremonies was sold for a large sum to Brogitarus, a profligate man, and unworthy of any such sacred character; especially as he had desired it not for the purpose of doing honour to the goddess, but only of profaning her temple. People were styled kings by the people, who would never have even asked for such a title from the senate: condemned exiles were brought back to Byzantium at the very time when citizens, who had not been condemned, were being driven from the city. King Ptolemaeus, who, if he had not as yet been himself styled an ally by the senate, was at all events the brother of that king, who, while his cause was identical with his, had long since received that honour from the senate; and was of the same family, sprung from the same ancestors as his brother,