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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 186 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 138 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 66 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 64 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 40 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 30 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Medea (ed. David Kovacs) 18 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Corinth (Greece) or search for Corinth (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 55 (search)
Why should I speak of Marcus Marcellus, who took Syracuse, that most beautiful city? why of Lucius Scipio, who waged war in Asia, and conquered Antiochus, a most powerful monarch? why of Flaminius, who subdued Philip the king, and Macedonia? why of Lucius Paullus, who with his might and valour conquered king Perses? why of Lucius Mummius, who overthrew that most beautiful and elegant city Corinth, full of all sorts of riches, and brought many cities of Achaia and Boeotia under the empire and dominion of the Roman people?—their houses, though they were rich in virtue and honour, were empty of statues and paintings. But we see the whole city, the temples of the gods, and all parts of Italy, adorned with their gifts, and with memorials of them.
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 83 (search)
injuries he has received from that man. Verres having often enjoyed his hospitality, and having not only stayed often with him at Thermae, but having almost dwelt with him there, took away from him out of his house everything which could in any uncommon degree delight the mind or eyes of any one. In truth, Sthenius from his youth had collected such things as these with more than ordinary diligence; elegant furniture of brass, made at Delos and at Corinth, paintings, and even a good deal of elegantly wrought silver, as far as the wealth of a citizen of Thermae could afford. And these things, when he was in Asia as a young man, he had collected diligently, as I said, not so much for any pleasure to himself, as for ornaments against the visits of Roman citizens, his own friends and connections, whenever he invited them.