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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Cumae (Italy) or search for Cumae (Italy) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
See Pind. O. 3.29(53)ff., with the Scholiast. Howbeit, by pleading necessity and laying the blame on Eurystheus, he appeased the anger of the goddess and carried the beast alive to Mycenae. As a fourth labour he ordered him to bring the Erymanthian boar alive;As to the Erymanthian boar and the centaurs, see Soph. Trach. 1095ff.; Diod. 4.12; Tzetzes, Chiliades ii.268ff.; Hyginus, Fab. 30. The boar's tusks were said to be preserved in a sanctuary of Apollo at Cumae in Campania (Paus. 8.24.5). now that animal ravaged Psophis, sallying from a mountain which they call Erymanthus. So passing through Pholoe he was entertained by the centaur Pholus, a son of Silenus by a Melian nymph.As to these nymphs, see Hesiod, Th. 187. The name perhaps means an ash-tree nymph (from meli/a, an ash tree), as Dryad means an oak tree nymph (from dru=s, an oak tree). He set roast meat before Hercules, while he himself ate his meat
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
lus 23; Arrian, Anabasis vii.20.5; Zenobius, Cent. iv.92; Tzetzes, Chiliades i.498ff.; Severus, Narr. 5, in Westermann's Mythographi Graeci, Appendix Narrationum, 32. p. 373; Scholiast on Hom. Il. ii.145; Ov. Met. 8.183-235; Hyginus, Fab. 40; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. pp. 16, 117 (First Vatican Mythographer 43, Second Vatican Mythographer 125). According to one account, Daedalus landed from his flight at Cumae, where he dedicated his wings to Apollo. See Verg. A. 6.14ff.; Juvenal iii.25. The myth of the flight of Daedalus and Icarus is rationalized by Diod. 4.77.5ff. and Paus. 9.11.4ff. According to Diodorus, the two were provided by Pasiphae with a ship in which they escaped, but in landing on a certain island Icarus fell into the sea and was drowned. According to Pausanias, father and son sailed in separate ships, scudding before the wind with sails, which Daedalu