hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 54 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 50 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 36 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 30 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Delos (Greece) or search for Delos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 3, line 580 (search)
re unto you all that is mine I give,’ and, at his death, he left me nothing but the running waves. — they are the sum of my inheritance. “And, afterwhile, that I might not be bound forever to my father's rocky shores, I learned to steer the keel with dextrous hand; and marked with watchful gaze the guiding stars; the watery Constellation of the Goat, Olenian, and the Bear, the Hyades, the Pleiades, the houses of the winds, and every harbour suitable for ships. “So chanced it, as I made for Delos, first I veered close to the shores of Chios: there I steered, by plying on the starboard oar, and nimbly leaping gained the sea-wet strand. “Now when the night was past and lovely dawn appeared, I,rose from slumber, and I bade my men to fetch fresh water, and I showed the pathway to the stream. Then did I climb a promontory's height, to learn from there the promise of the winds; which having done, I called the men and sought once more my ship. Opheltes, first of my companions, cried,
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 8, line 183 (search)
rd leads forth her tender young, from high-swung nest to try the yielding air; so he prevailed on willing Icarus; encouraged and instructed him in a]l the fatal art; and as he waved his wings looked backward on his son. Beneath their flight, the fisherman while casting his long rod, or the tired shepherd leaning on his crook, or the rough plowman as he raised his eyes, astonished might observe them on the wing, and worship them as Gods. Upon the left they passed by Samos, Juno's sacred isle; Delos and Paros too, were left behind; and on the right Lebinthus and Calymne, fruitful in honey. Proud of his success, the foolish Icarus forsook his guide, and, bold in vanity, began to soar, rising upon his wings to touch the skies; but as he neared the scorching sun, its heat softened the fragrant wax that held his plumes; and heat increasing melted the soft wax— he waved his naked arms instead of wings, with no more feathers to sustain his flight. And as he called upon his father's name his v
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 13, line 623 (search)
be destroyed entirely with her walls. Aeneas, the heroic son of Venus, bore on his shoulders holy images and still another holy weight, his sire, a venerable burden. From all his wealth the pious hero chose this for his care together with his child, Ascanius. Then with a fleet of exiles he sails forth, he leaves Antandrus, leaves the wicked realm and shore of Thrace now dripping with the blood of Polydorus. With fair winds and tide he and his comrades reach Apollo's isle. Good Anius, king of Delos, vigilant for all his subjects' welfare, and as priest devoted to Apollo, took him there into his temple and his home, and showed the city, the famed shrines, and the two trees which once Latona, while in labor, held. They burned sweet incense, adding to it wine, and laid the flesh of cattle in the flames, an offering marked by custom for the god. Then in the palace and its kingly hall, reclining on luxurious couches, they drank flowing wine with Ceres' gifts of food. But old Anchises asked:
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 479 (search)
nd that I might not be seen and cause men envy by new life: and that she might be sure my life was safe she made me seem an old man; and she changed me so that I could not be recognized. “A long time she debated whether she would give me Crete or Delos for my home. Delos and Crete abandoned, she then brought me here, and at the same time ordered me to lay aside my former name—one which when mentioned would remind me of my steeds. She said to me, ‘You were Hippolytus, but now instead you shall bDelos and Crete abandoned, she then brought me here, and at the same time ordered me to lay aside my former name—one which when mentioned would remind me of my steeds. She said to me, ‘You were Hippolytus, but now instead you shall be Virbius.’ And from that time I have inhabited this grove; and, as one of the lesser gods, I live concealed and numbered in her train.” The grief of others could not ease the woe of sad Egeria, and she laid herself down at a mountain's foot, dissolved in tears, till moved by pity for her faithful sorrow, Diana changed her body to a spring, her limbs into a clear conti