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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 54 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 50 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 36 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 30 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden). You can also browse the collection for Delos (Greece) or search for Delos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 3, line 135 (search)
Our ships are haul'd upon the yellow strand; The youth begin to till the labor'd land; And I myself new marriages promote, Give laws, and dwellings I divide by lot; When rising vapors choke the wholesome air, And blasts of noisome winds corrupt the year; The trees devouring caterpillars burn; Parch'd was the grass, and blighted was the corn: Nor 'scape the beasts; for Sirius, from on high, With pestilential heat infects the sky: My men—some fall, the rest in fevers fry. Again my father bids me seek the shore Of sacred Delos, and the god implore, To learn what end of woes we might expect, And to what clime our weary course direct
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 4, line 129 (search)
on either hand The brawny guards in martial order stand. A flow'r'd simar with golden fringe she wore, And at her back a golden quiver bore; Her flowing hair a golden caul restrains, A golden clasp the Tyrian robe sustains. Then young Ascanius, with a sprightly grace, Leads on the Trojan youth to view the chase. But far above the rest in beauty shines The great Aeneas, the troop he joins; Like fair Apollo, when he leaves the frost Of wint'ry Xanthus, and the Lycian coast, When to his native Delos he resorts, Ordains the dances, and renews the sports; Where painted Scythians, mix'd with Cretan bands, Before the joyful altars join their hands: Himself, on Cynthus walking, sees below The merry madness of the sacred show. Green wreaths of bays his length of hair inclose; A golden fillet binds his awful brows; His quiver sounds: not less the prince is seen In manly presence, or in lofty mien. Now had they reach'd the hills, and storm'd the seat Of salvage beasts, in dens, their last retre