hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 334 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 208 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 84 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 34 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 34 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 26 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 24 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 18 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Ion (ed. Robert Potter) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis. You can also browse the collection for Delphi (Greece) or search for Delphi (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Plato, Alcibiades 1, section 129a (search)
AlcibiadesImpossible.SocratesWell, and is it an easy thing to know oneself, and was it a mere scamp who inscribed these words on the temple at Delphi; or is it a hard thing, and not a task for anybody?AlcibiadesI have often thought, Socrates, that it was for anybody; but often, too, that it was very hard.SocratesBut, Alcibiades, whether it is easy or not, here is the fact for us all the same: if we have that knowledge, we are like to know what pains to take over ourselves; but if we have it not, we never can.AlcibiadesThat is so.
Plato, Charmides, section 164d (search)
I would rather withdraw some of them, and not be ashamed to say my statements were wrong, than concede at any time that a man who is ignorant of himself is temperate. For I would almost say that this very thing, self-knowledge, is temperance, and I am at one with him who put up the inscription of those words at Delphi. For the purpose of that inscription on the temple, as it seems to me, is to serve as the god's salutation to those who enter it, instead of
Plato, Charmides, section 165a (search)
the inscriptionThroughout this passage there is allusion to the thought or wisdom implied in swfronei=n, and here Critias seeks to identify fro/nei (“think well,” “be wise”) with gnw=qi (“know,” “understand”) in the inscription gnw=qi sauto/n at Delphi. and I declare, though one is likely enough to think them different—an error into which I consider the dedicators of the later inscriptions fell when they put up Nothing overmuchMHDE\N A)/GANappears first in Theognis, 335. and A pledge, and thereupon perdition.*)eggu/a pa/ra d' a)/th, an old saying on the rashness of giving a pledge, is quoted in a fragment of Cratinus, the elder rival of Aristophanes. Cf. Proverbs xi. 15—”He that is surety for a stranger shall smart for it.” For they supposed that Know thyself! was a piece of advice, and not the god's salutation of those who were entering; and so, in order that their dedications too might equally give pieces of useful advice, they wrote these words and dedicated them.
Plato, Lysis, section 205c (search)
but he only writes and relates things that the whole city sings of, recalling Democrates and the boy's grandfather Lysis and all his ancestors, with their wealth and the horses they kept, and their victories at Delphi, the Isthmus, and Nemea,The Pythian Games were held at Delphi, the Isthmian near Corinth, and the Nemean at Nemea, between Corinth and Argos. with chariot-teams and coursers, and, in addition, even hoarier antiquities than these. Only two days ago he was recounting to us in some pnd all his ancestors, with their wealth and the horses they kept, and their victories at Delphi, the Isthmus, and Nemea,The Pythian Games were held at Delphi, the Isthmian near Corinth, and the Nemean at Nemea, between Corinth and Argos. with chariot-teams and coursers, and, in addition, even hoarier antiquities than these. Only two days ago he was recounting to us in some poem of his the entertainment of Hercules,—how on account of his kinship with Hercules their forefather welcomed the hero