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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 26 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Dodona (Greece) or search for Dodona (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 2, chapter 23 (search)
women always discern the truth; similarly, at Athens, when Mantias the orator was litigating with his son, the mother declared the truth;Mantias had one legitimate son Mantitheus and two illegitimate by a certain Plangon. Mantias at first refused to acknowledge the latter as his sons, until the mother declared they were. and again, at Thebes, when Ismenias and Stilbon were disputing about a child, DodonisThe name of the mother; or simply, “the woman of Dodona,” like “the woman of Peparethus.” declared that Ismenias was its father, Thettaliscus being accordingly recognized as the son of Ismenias. There is another instance in the “law” of Theodectes: “If we do not entrust our own horses to those who have neglected the horses of others, or our ships to those who have upset the ships of others; then, if this is so in all cases, we must not entrust our own safety to those who have failed to preserve the safet