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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 26 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 8 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 6 0 Browse Search
Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus. You can also browse the collection for Dodona (Greece) or search for Dodona (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Plato, Phaedrus, section 244b (search)
and the priestesses at Dodona when they have been mad have conferred many splendid benefits upon Greece both in private and in public affairs, but few or none when they have been in their right minds; and if we should speak of the Sibyl and all the others who by prophetic inspiration have foretold many things to many persons and thereby made them fortunate afterwards, anyone can see that we should speak a long time. And it is worth while to adduce also the fact that those men of old who invented names thought that madness was neither shameful nor disgraceful;
Plato, Phaedrus, section 275b (search)
to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, but only appear wise.PhaedrusSocrates, you easily make up stories of Egypt or any country you please.SocratesThey used to say, my friend, that the words of the oak in the holy place of Zeus at Dodona were the first prophetic utterances. The people of that time, not being so wise as you young folks, were content in their simplicity to hear an oak