hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 2 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Lysistrata (ed. Jack Lindsay) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Echinus or search for Echinus in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Polybius, Histories, book 9, Investment of Echinus by Philip (search)
Investment of Echinus by Philip Having determined to make his approach upon the In the campaigns of Philip, during the time that Publius Sulpicius Galba as Proconsul commanded a Roman fleet in Greek waters, i.e. from B. C. 209 to B. C. 206. See Livy, 26, 22, 28; 28, 5-7; 29, 12. town at the two towers, he erected opposite to them diggers' sheds and rams; and opposite the space between the towers he erected a covered way between the rams, parallel to the wall. And when the plan was complete, thng to the works from the camp or returning from the works, being wounded in any way by missiles from the town. These works were completed in a very few days, because the district round produced what was wanted for this service in abundance. For Echinus is situated on the Melian Gulf, facing south, exactly opposite the territory of Thronium, and enjoys a soil rich in every kind of produce; thanks to which circumstance Philip had no scarcity of anything he required for his purpose. Accordingly,
Polybius, Histories, book 9, Asia and Egypt (search)
Asia and Egypt While Philip was investing Echinus, and had secured his position excellently on the side of the town, and had strengthened the outer line of his camp with a trench and wall, Publius Sulpicius, the Roman pro-consul, and Dorimachus, Strategus of the Aetolians, arrived in person,—Publius with a fleet, and Dorimachus with an army of infantry and cavalry,—and assaulted Philip's entrenchment. Their repulse led to greater exertions on Philip's part in his attack upon the Echinaeans, who in despair surrendered to him. For Dorimachus was not able to reduce Philip by cutting off his supplies, as he got them by sea. . . . When Aegina was taken by the Romans, such of theAegina taken before the end of 208 B. C., for Sulpicius wintered there between 208-207 B. C. See Livy, 27, 32. inhabitants as had not escaped crowded together at the ships, and begged the pro-consul to allow them to send ambassadors to cities of their kinsmen to obtain ransom. Publius at first returned a harsh answ