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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 60 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 56 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 34 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 10 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 10 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 6 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White). You can also browse the collection for Eleusis (Greece) or search for Eleusis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Hymn 2 to Demeter (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 87 (search)
gods and high Olympus, and went to the towns and rich fields of men, disfiguring her form a long while. And no one of men or deep-bosomed women knew her when they saw her, until she came to the house of wise Celeus who then was lord of fragrant Eleusis. Vexed in her dear heart, she sat near the wayside by the Maiden Well, from which the women of the place were used to draw water, in a shady place over which grew an olive shrub. And she was like an ancient woman who is cut off from childbearing and the gifts of garland-loving Aphrodite, like the nurses of kings' children who deal justice, or like the house-keepers in their echoing halls. There the daughters of Celeus, son of Eleusis, saw her, as they were coming for easy-drawn water, to carry it in pitchers of bronze to their dear father's house: four were they and like goddesses in the flower of their girlhood, Callidice and Cleisidice and lovely Demo and Callithoe+ who was the eldest of them all. They knew her not, —for the gods ar
Hymn 2 to Demeter (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 292 (search)
white barley was cast upon the land without avail. So she would have destroyed the whole race of man with cruel famine and have robbed them who dwell on Olympus of their glorious right of gifts and sacrifices, had not Zeus perceived and marked this in his heart. First he sent golden-winged Iris to call rich-haired Demeter, lovely in form. So he commanded. And she obeyed the dark-clouded Son of Cronos, and sped with swift feet across the space between. She came to the stronghold of fragrant Eleusis, and there finding dark-cloaked Demeter in her temple, spake to her and uttered winged words: “Demeter, father Zeus, whose wisdom is everlasting, calls you to come join the tribes of the eternal gods: come therefore, and let not the message I bring from Zeus pass unobeyed.” Thus said Iris imploring her. But Demeter's heart was not moved. Then again the father sent forth all the blessed and eternal gods besides: and they came, one after the other, and kept calling her and offering many very
Hymn 2 to Demeter (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 347 (search)
he departed, father Zeus bids me bring noble Persephone forth from Erebus unto the gods, that her mother may see her with her eyes and cease from her dread anger with the immortals; for now she plans an awful deed, to destroy the weakly tribes of earth-born men by keeping seed hidden beneath the earth, and so she makes an end of the honors of the undying gods. For she keeps fearful anger and does not consort with the gods, but sits aloof in her fragrant temple, dwelling in the rocky hold of Eleusis.” So he said. And Aidoneus, ruler over the dead, smiled grimly and obeyed the behest of Zeus the king. For he straightway urged wise Persephone, saying: “Go now, Persephone, to your dark-robed mother, go, and feel kindly in your heart towards me: be not so exceedingly cast down; for I shall be no unfitting husband for you among the deathless gods, that am own brother to father Zeus. And while you are here, you shall rule all that lives and moves and shall have the greatest rights among the
Hymn 2 to Demeter (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 449 (search)
lyxeinus and Diocles also, —awful mysteries which no one may in any way transgress or pry into or utter, for deep awe of the gods checks the voice. Happy is he among men upon earth who has seen these mysteries; but he who is uninitiate and who has no part in them, never has lot of like good things once he is dead, down in the darkness and gloom. But when the bright goddess had taught them all, they went to Olympus to the gathering of the other gods. And there they dwell beside Zeus who delights in thunder, awful and reverend goddesses. Right blessed is he among men on earth whom they freely love: soon they do send Plutus as guest to his great house, Plutus who gives wealth to mortal men. And now, queen of the land of sweet Eleusis and sea-girt Paros and rocky Antron, lady, giver of good gifts, bringer of seasons, queen Deo, be gracious, you and your daughter all beauteous Persephone, and for my song grant me heart-cheering substance. And now I will remember you and another song also