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Pausanias, Description of Greece 310 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 62 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Elis (Greece) or search for Elis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 1 For Hieron of Syracuse Single Horse Race 476 B. C. (search)
youth, and down darkened his cheek, he turned his thoughts to an available marriage, to win glorious Hippodameia from her father, the lord of Pisa. He drew near to the gray sea, alone in the darkness, and called aloud on the deep-roaring god, skilled with the trident; and the god appeared to him, close at hand.Pelops said to the god, “If the loving gifts of Cyprian Aphrodite result in any gratitude, Poseidon, then restrain the bronze spear of Oenomaus, and speed me in the swiftest chariot to Elis, and bring me to victory. For he has killed thirteensuitors,reading mnasth=ras, with the mss.and postpones the marriage of his daughter. Great danger does not take hold of a coward. Since all men are compelled to die, why should anyone sit stewing an inglorious old age in the darkness, with no share of any fine deeds? As for me, on this contestI will take my stand. May you grant a welcome achievement.” So he spoke, and he did not touch on words that were unaccomplished. Honoring him, the god
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. (search)
Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. The resounding strain of Archilochus, the swelling thrice-repeated song of triumph, sufficed to lead Epharmostus to the hill of Cronus, in victory-procession with his dear companions.But now, from the bow of the Muses who, shooting from afar, send a shower of such arrows of song as these on Zeus of the red lightning-bolt and on the sacred height of Elis, which once the Lydian hero Pelopswon as the very fine dowry of Hippodameia. And shoot a winged sweet arrow to Pytho; for your words will not fall to the ground, short of the mark, when you trill the lyre in honor of the wrestling of the man from renowned Opus. Praise Opus and her son;praise her whom Themis and her glorious daughter, the savior Eunomia, have received under their protection; she flourishes with excellence beside your stream, Castalia, and beside the Alpheus. From there the choicest garlandsglorify the famous mother-city of the Locrians with her splendid trees
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 10 For Hagesidamus of Western Locri Boys' Boxing 476 B.C. (search)
ng of that extraordinary contest-place which Heracles founded by the ancient tomb of Pelopswith its six altars, after he killed Cteatus, the flawless son of Poseidon and Eurytus too, with a will to exact from the unwilling Augeas, strong and violent, the wages for his menial labor.Heracles lay in wait in the thicket below Cleonae, and in his turn overcame those men by the roadside; for once before those arrogant Moliones had destroyed his Tirynthian army, when it was encamped in the valley of Elis. And indeed it was not much later before the man who betrayed his friend,the king of the Epeians, saw his land with all its possessions, his own city, sink into a deep channel of destruction beneath unyielding fire and blows of iron. A fight with a stronger manis impossible to push away. So even he, by his own senselessness, last of all found himself captured and did not escape sheer destruction. But the brave son of Zeus gathered the entire army and all the spoils together in Pisaand measure