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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 310 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 62 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus. You can also browse the collection for Elis (Greece) or search for Elis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Plato, Symposium, section 182a (search)
just as we force them, so far as we can, to refrain from loving our freeborn women. These are the persons responsible for the scandal which prompts some to say it is a shame to gratify one's lover: such are the cases they have in view, for they observe all their reckless and wrongful doings; and surely, whatsoever is done in an orderly and lawful manner can never justly bring reproach.“Further, it is easy to note the rule with regard to love in other cities: there it is laid down in simple terms, while ours here is complicated. For in Elis
Plato, Phaedrus, section 267b (search)
by the power of their words, and new things old and old things the reverse, and who invented conciseness of speech and measureless length on all subjects? And once when Prodicus heard these inventions, he laughed, and said that he alone had discovered the art of proper speech, that discourses should be neither long nor short, but of reasonable length.PhaedrusO Prodicus! How clever!SocratesAnd shall we not mention Hippias, our friend from Elis? I think he would agree with him.PhaedrusOh yes.