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Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 10 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Clouds (ed. William James Hickie) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Economics 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Ephesos (Turkey) or search for Ephesos (Turkey) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Trach. 252ff., was only one year; but Herodorus, cited by the Scholiast on Soph. Tr. 253, says that it was three years, which agrees with the statement of Apollodorus. daughter of Iardanes, queen of Lydia, to whom at his death her husband Tmolus had bequeathed the government. Eurytus did not accept the compensation when it was presented to him, but Hercules served Omphale as a slave, and in the course of his servitude he seized and bound the Cercopes at Ephesus;As to the Cercopes, see Diod. 4.31.7; Nonnus, in Mythographi Graeci, ed. A. Westermann, Appendix Narrationum, 39, p. 375; Tzetzes, Chiliades ii.431, v.73ff.; Zenobius, Cent. v.10; Apostolius, Cent. xi.19. These malefactors were two in number. Herakles is said to have carried them hanging with their heads downward from a pole. They are so represented in Greek art. See W. H. Roscher, Lexikon der griech. und röm. Mythologie, ii.1166ff. The na
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
es in front of the plough, whereupon the father at once checked the plough and betrayed his sanity. However, Lucian agrees with Apollodorus in saying that Palamedes threatened the child with his sword, though at the same time, by mentioning the unlike animals yoked together, he shows that he had the scene of the ploughing in his mind. His description purports to be based on a picture, probably a famous picture of the scene which was still exhibited at Ephesus in the time of Pliny, Nat. Hist. xxxv.129. Sophocles wrote a play on the subject, called The Mad Ulysses. See The Fragments of Sophocles, ed. A. C. Pearson, vol. ii. pp. 115ff. Having taken a Phrygian prisoner, Ulysses compelled him to write a letter of treasonable purport ostensibly sent by Priam to Palamedes; and having buried gold in the quarters of Palamedes, he dropped the letter in the camp. Agamemnon read the letter, f