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E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Luca (Italy) or search for Luca (Italy) in all documents.

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E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Later years. Relations with Caesar. (search)
rivals with Lesbia. With far more earnestness did he throw himself into the political quarrel of his time. The year of his return from Bithynia (56 B.C.) had witnessed the so-called renewal of the triumvirate at Luca, and Caesar appeared to have won everything. In accordance with the agreement made at the Luca conference, Pompey and Crassus were consuls a second time for the year 55, and the senatorial party was at Luca conference, Pompey and Crassus were consuls a second time for the year 55, and the senatorial party was at its wits' end. Catullus was apparently not an active political worker, but he did not hesitate to join his political friends in personal attacks upon the foe. Perhaps his earlier shafts were those aimed against Mamurra (cf. ยง 73), Caesar's notorious favorite (cc. 29, 41, 43, 57), whom Catullus sometimes celebrates under the nickname of Mentula (cc. 94, 105, 114, 115), and these opened the way for the direct attack upon Cae
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 29 (search)
rriage? With this final appeal cf. Catul. 9.10n. urbis: etc. see Crit. App. socer generque: perhaps with a sneer at the political interests that dictated the marriage of Caesar's daughter to a man over twenty years her senior, who had lately divorced his wife on suspicion of adultery with Caesar himself. Yet the marriage had actually proved a very happy one on both sides. perdidistis omnia: the familiar cry of the optimates at this time, when they had become more estranged from their former idol, Pompey, by events following upon the famous council of the so-called triumvirs at Luca in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 52 (search)
sella in curuli: apparently indicating that Nonius had just attained the first of the curule offices, the curule aedileship, perhaps as part of the program settled upon at the conference at Luca in 56 B.C. This would very well fit Nonius Asprenas, who was an officer of Caesar in the African War in 46 with the title of proconsul (Bell. Afr. 80.4; Bell. Hisp. 10.2), and perhaps not so well M. Nonius S over Cato. Already in 56 Cicero had charged him with impudent assurance regarding a future consulship, and to the same characteristic Catullus refers here. But the coveted advancement was doubtless promised by Caesar at Luca, and this promotion to the praetorship was regarded but as a step thereto by Vatinius and by Catullus as well, whose indignation was all the more fired by it. The first verse is identical with the last