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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 90 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 82 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 22 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 18 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Acharnians (ed. Anonymous) 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 14 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 10 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Megara (Greece) or search for Megara (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 1, chapter 5 (search)
e desired by the ambitious and by those who are fond of money, since they are an acquisition for the latter and an honor for the former; so that they furnish both with what they want. Bodily excellence is health, and of such a kind that when exercising the body we are free from sickness; for many are healthy in the way HerodicusOf Selymbria, physician and teacher of hygienic gymnastics (c. 420 B.C.). He is said to have made his patients walk from Athens to Megara and back, about 70 miles. He was satirized by Plato and by his old pupil Hippocrates as one who killed those for whom he prescribed (cf. 2.23.29). is said to have been, whom no one would consider happy in the matter of health, because they are obliged to abstain from all or nearly all human enjoyments. Beauty varies with each age. In a young man, it consists in possessing a body capable of enduring all efforts, either of the racecourse or of bodily streng
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 1, chapter 7 (search)
is: “the poet says that (the recital of the three verses) persuaded.” The passage is from Hom. Il. 9.592-594 (slightly different). All the ills that befall those whose city is taken; the people perish, and fire utterly destroys the city, and strangers carry off the children. Combination and building up, as employed by Epicharmus,Epicharmus (c. 550-460 B.C.) writer of comedies and Pythagorean philosopher, was born at Megara in Sicily (according to others, in the island of Cos). His comedies, written in the Doric dialect, and without a chorus, were either mythological or comedies of manners, as extant titles show. Plato speaks of him as “the prince of comedy” and Horace states definitely that he was imitated by Plautus. produce the same effect as division, and for the same reason; for combination is an exhibition of great superiority and appears to be the