hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 2 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10. You can also browse the collection for Methone or search for Methone in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Demosthenes, Olynthiac 1, section 9 (search)
Once again, when news came of the siege of Pydna, of Potidaea, of Methone, of Pagasae,In 357, 356, 354, and 352 respectively. and of the rest of them—not to weary you with a complete catalogue—if we had at that time shown the required zeal in marching to the help of the first that appealed, we should have found Philip today much more humble and accommodating. Unfortunately we always neglect the present chance and imagine that the future will right itself, and so, men of Athens, Philip has us to thank for his prosperity. We have raised him to a greater height than ever king of Macedonia reached before. Today this opportunity comes to us from the Olynthians unsought, a fairer opportunity than we have ever had befo
Demosthenes, Olynthiac 1, section 12 (search)
But if we leave these men too in the lurch, Athenians, and then Olynthus is crushed by Philip, tell me what is to prevent him from marching henceforward just where he pleases. I wonder if any one of you in this audience watches and notes the steps by which Philip, weak at first, has grown so powerful. First he seized Amphipolis, next Pydna, then Potidaea, after that Methone, lastly he invaded Thessaly.
Demosthenes, Philippic 1, section 4 (search)
But if anyone here, Athenians, is inclined to think Philip too formidable, having regard to the extent of his existing resources and to our loss of all our strongholds, he is indeed right, yet he must reflect that we too, men of Athens, once held Pydna, Potidaea, and Methone and had in our own hands all the surrounding territory, and that many of the native tribes now in his service were then free and independent and were indeed more inclined to side with us than with Philip.
Demosthenes, Philippic 1, section 35 (search)
And yet, men of Athens, how do you account for the fact that the Panathenaic festival and the Dionysia are always held at the right date, whether experts or laymen are chosen by lot to manage them, that larger sums are lavished upon them than upon any one of your expeditions, that they are celebrated with bigger crowds and greater splendor than anything else of the kind in the world, whereas your expeditions invariably arrive too late, whether at Methone or at Pagasae or at Potidaea?
Demosthenes, Philippic 3, section 26 (search)
[And this is easily proved by a short calculation.] I pass over Olynthus and Methone and Apollonia and the two and thirty cities in or near Thrace, all of which Philip has destroyed so ruthlessly that a traveler would find it hard to say whether they had ever been inhabited. I say nothing of the destruction of the important nation of the Phocians. But how stands the case of the Thessalians? Has he not robbed them of their free constitutions and of their very cities, setting up tetrarchies in order to enslave them, not city by city, but tribe by tribe?