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Pausanias, Description of Greece 60 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 4 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Nemea (Greece) or search for Nemea (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
had a son Promachus, who marched with the Epigoni against Thebes;Compare below, Apollod. 3.7.2. and Mecisteus had a son Euryalus, who went to Troy.See Hom. Il. 2.565ff. Pronax had a son Lycurgus; and Adrastus had by Amphithea, daughter of Pronax, three daughters, Argia, Deipyle, and Aegialia, and two sons, Aegialeus and Cyanippus. Pheres, son of Cretheus, founded Pherae in Thessaly and begat Admetus and Lycurgus. Lycurgus took up his abode at Nemea, and having married Eurydice, or, as some say, Amphithea, he begat Opheltes, afterwards called Archemorus.See below, Apollod. 3.6.4. When Admetus reigned over Pherae, Apollo served him as his thrall,See below, Apollod. 3.10.4. while Admetus wooed Alcestis, daughter of Pelias. Now Pelias had promised to give his daughter to him who should yoke a lion and a boar to a car, and Apollo yoked and gave them to Admetus, who brought them to Pelias and so ob
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
men—Teutarus, Eurytus, and Rhadamanthys—to whom the honour of having taught Herakles to shoot was variously assigned by tradition. Hercules received a sword from Hermes, a bow and arrows from Apollo,As to the gifts of the gods to Herakles, see Diod. 4.13.3, who, besides the sword and bow given by Hermes and Apollo, mentions horses given by Poseidon. a golden breastplate from Hephaestus, and a robe from Athena; for he had himself cut a club at Nemea. Now it came to pass that after the battle with the Minyans Hercules was driven mad through the jealousy of Hera and flung his own children, whom he had by Megara, and two children of Iphicles into the fire;Compare Eur. Herc. 967ff.; Moschus iv.13ff.; Diod. 4.11.1ff.; Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 38; Nicolaus Damascenus, Frag. 20, in Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum, ed. C. Müller, iii.369; Hyginus, Fab. 32. wherefore he condemned hims
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
to Brasidas). Sometimes the verbs e)nagi/zein and e)nte/mnein are coupled in this sense. See Philostratus, Her. xx.27, 28. For more evidence as to the use of these words, see Fr. Pfister, Der Reliquienkult im Altertum (Giessen, 1909-1912), pp. 466ff. Compare P. Foucart, Le culte des héros chez les Grecs (Paris, 1918), pp. 96, 98 (from the Memoires de l' Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres, vol. xlii). And having come to Nemea and tracked the lion, he first shot an arrow at him, but when he perceived that the beast was invulnerable, he heaved up his club and made after him. And when the lion took refuge in a cave with two mouths, Hercules built up the one entrance and came in upon the beast through the other, and putting his arm round its neck held it tight till he had choked it; so laying it on his shoulders he carried it to Cleonae. And finding Molorchus on the last of the
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
10.10.3. and MecisteusBrother of Adrastus. See Apollod. 1.9.13. in the list of the seven. Having come to Nemea, of which Lycurgus was king, they sought for water; and Hypsipyle showed them the way to a spring, leaving behind tes, whom she nursed, a child of Eurydice and Lycurgus.As to the meeting of the Seven Champions with Hypsipyle at Nemea, the death of Opheltes, and the institution of the Nemean games, see Scholiast on Pind. N., Arg. pp. 424ff. ed. been chosen for the same sad reason (Serv. Verg. Ecl. 6.68). However, according to another account, the crowns at Nemea were originally made of olive, but the material was changed to parsley after the disasters of the Persian war (Scholiast on Pind. N., Arg. p. 425). The grave of Opheltes was at Nemea, enclosed by a stone wall; and there were altars within the enclosure (Paus. 2.15.3). Euripides wrote a tragedy Hypsipyle, of which m