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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 384 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 24 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 14 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Letters. You can also browse the collection for Olympia (Greece) or search for Olympia (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Plato, Letters, Letter 2 (search)
us all and to the rest of the Greeks also, as I affirm. But as it is, my greatness consists in making myself follow my own instructions.This closely resemblesPlat. Laws 835c (withMO/NOSforME/GAS). However, I do not say this as though what Cratistolus and PolyxenusPolyxenus was a Sophist and a disciple of Bryson of Megara, cf. Plat. L. 2.314dand Plat. L. 13.360c. Of Cratistolus nothing further is known. have told you is to be trusted; for it is said that one of these men declares that at OlympiaProbably the Olympic Festival of 364 B.C. (not 360 B.C. as in Plat. L. 7.350b); see the Prefatory Note. he heard quite a number of my companions maligning you. No doubt his hearing is more acute than mine; for I certainly heard no such thing. For the future, whenever anyone makes such a statement about any of us, what you ought, I think, to do is to send me a letter of inquiry; for I shall tell the truth without scruple or shame.Now as for you and me, the relation in which we stand towa
Plato, Letters, Letter 7 (search)
oundation of the events which have now taken place in regard to Dion and in regard to Syracuse; and of still more events, as is to be feared, unless you now hearken to the counsel I offer you now, for the second time.The first occasion being at Olympia in 360 B.C.; cf. Plat. L. 7.350b ff.What, then, do I mean by saying that my arrival in Sicily on that occasion was the foundation of everything? When I associated with Dion, who was then a youth, instructing him verbally in what I believed wasous to depart, and begging him by all means to give his consent. To this he agreed, and he sent me forth after giving me supplies for the journey; but as to Dion's money, neither did I ask for any of it nor did anyone pay me any.On arriving at Olympia,i.e. for the festival of 360 B.C. in the Peloponnese, I came upon Dion, who was attending the Games; and I reported what had taken place. And he, calling Zeus to witness, was invoking me and my relatives and friends to prepare at once to take