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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 20 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 14 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 12 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 12 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Economics 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20. You can also browse the collection for Olynthus or search for Olynthus in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 7 document sections:

Demosthenes, On the Crown, section 48 (search)
Look at these instances, because, though the right time for action is past, for wise men it is always the right time to understand history. Lasthenes was hailed as friend—until he betrayed Olynthus; Timolaus, until he brought Thebes to ruin; Eudicus and Simus of Larissa, until they put Thessaly under Philip's heel. Since then the whole world has become crowded with men exiled, insulted, punished in every conceivable way. What of Aristratus at Sicyon? or PerilausPerilaus: so MSS. here, and, with variations, in 295; according to Greek lexicographers the name was Perillus. at Megara? Are they not outcasts
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 146 (search)
Surely, men of Athens, it is strange and intolerable that the disasters of your allies have become the emolument of your envoys, and that one and the same peace should have brought, to the city sending ambassadors, the destruction of allies, dispossession of property, ignominy in exchange for honor, and to the ambassadors themselves who intrigued against the city, revenues, property, estates, and opulence in exchange for penury. To prove the truth of my statement, call the witnesses from Olynthus. Witnesses
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 192 (search)
To show you, then, that these men are the basest and most depraved of all Philip's visitors, private as well as official,—yes, of all of them,—let me tell you a trifling story that has nothing to do with the embassy. After Philip had taken Olynthus, he was holding Olympian games,Not the great Olympian Games of Elis, but a Macedonian festival held at Dium. The date is probably the spring of 347 B.C. and had invited all sorts of artists to the religious celebration and the festiv
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 194 (search)
Philip bade him speak out, declaring with the easy generosity of youth that there was nothing he would not do for him. Thereupon Satyrus told him that Apollophanes of Pydna had been a friend of his, and that after his death by assassination his kinsmen in alarm had secretly removed his daughters, who were then children, to Olynthus. These girls had been made captive when the town was taken, and were now in Philip's hands, and of marriageable age.
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 264 (search)
they were invaded by the Lacedaemonians with a large force, both naval and military; and you will remember that in those days the Lacedaemonians may be said to have held command both of land and of sea. Yet in spite of the strength of the attacking force, they never lost a town or even an outpost, they won many engagements, they slew three of the enemy commanders, and finally brought the war to an end on their own terms.Some Chalcidian cities obtained aid against the growing power of Olynthus, and the war lasted from 382 to 379, when the Olynthians sued for peace and became members of the Spartan Confederacy, not exactly “on their own terms.”
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 295 (search)
Not one. When there was still such a city as Olynthus, were there any thieves there? I take it there were. Did Olynthus perish through their sins? No. Do you suppose there were no thieves and pilferers of public funds in Megara? There must have been such. Has any one of them been shown to be responsible for the present political troubles there? Not one. Then who are the people who commit these monOlynthus perish through their sins? No. Do you suppose there were no thieves and pilferers of public funds in Megara? There must have been such. Has any one of them been shown to be responsible for the present political troubles there? Not one. Then who are the people who commit these monstrous crimes? Persons who fancy themselves important enough to be called friends of Philip, men itching for military commands and eager for political distinction, men who claim superiority over the common herd. At Megara the other day was not Perillus tried before the Three Hundred on a charge of visiting Philip? And did not Ptoeodorus, the first man in all Megara for wealth, birth, and
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 332 (search)
Some one came up to me just now in front of the court, and told me a very odd thing. Aeschines, he said, had prepared himself to denounce the general Chares,Chares: for thirty years an unlucky, or incompetent, commander by land and sea; politically, a friend of Demosthenes; had commanded the unsuccessful expedition sent too late for the relief of Olynthus. hoping to cajole you by his eloquent treatment of that topic. I will not lay too much stress on the observation that, whenever Chares has been brought to trial, he has been found to have acted faithfully and loyally, so far as in him lay, in your interests, though he has often failed of success by the fault of the people who do mischief for money. I will go so far as to grant for argument's sake that every word Aeschines will