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Polybius, Histories 602 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 226 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 104 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 102 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 92 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 1 90 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 80 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 80 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 78 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Rome (Italy) or search for Rome (Italy) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 479 (search)
with a mind well taught by these and other precepts traveled back to his own land and, being urged again, assumed the guidance of the Latin state. Blest with a nymph as consort, blest also with the Muses for his guides, he taught the rites of sacrifice and trained in arts of peace a race accustomed long to savage war. When, ripe in years, he ended reign and life, the Latin matrons, the fathers of the state, and all the people wept for Numa's death. For the nymph, his widow, had withdrawn from Rome, concealed within the thick groves of the vale Aricia, where with groans and wailing she disturbed the holy rites of Cynthia, established by Orestes. Ah! how often nymphs of the grove and lake entreated her to cease and offered her consoling words. How often the son of Theseus said to her “Control your sorrow; surely your sad lot is not the only one; consider now the like calamities by others borne, and you can bear your sorrow. To my grief my own disaster was far worse than yours. At least i
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 622 (search)
seek for nearer you. Then seek it nearer, for you do not need Apollo to relieve your wasting plague, you need Apollo's son. Go then to him with a good omen and invite his aid.” After the prudent Senate had received Phoebus Apollo's words, they took much pains to learn what town the son of Phoebus might inhabit. They despatched ambassadors under full sail to the coast of Epidaurus. When the curved ships had touched the shore, these men in haste went to the Grecian elders there and prayed that Rome might have the deity whose presence would drive out the mortal ill from their Ausonian nation; for they knew response unerring had directed them. The councillors dismayed, could not agree on their reply: some thought that aid ought not to be refused, but many more held back, declaring it was wise to keep the god for their own safety and not give away a guardian deity. And, while they talked, discussing it, the twilight had expelled the waning day, and darkness on the earth spread a thick man
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 680 (search)
t of crackling scales, again he climbed into the lofty stern and near the rudder laid his head at rest. There he remained until the vessel passed by Castrum and Lavinium's sacred homes to where the Tiber flows into the sea there all the people of Rome came rushing out— mothers and fathers and even those who tend your sacred fire, O Trojan goddess Vesta— and joyous shouted welcome to the god. Wherever the swift ship steered through the tide, they built up many altars in a line, so that perfuming frankincense with smoke crackled along the banks on either hand, and victims made the keen knives hot with blood. The serpent-deity has entered Rome, the world's new capital and, lifting up his head above the summit of the mast, looked far and near for a congenial home. The river there, dividing, flows about a place known as the Island, on both sides an equal stream glides past dry middle ground. And here the serpent child of Phoebus left the Roman ship, took his own heavenly form, and brought
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 745 (search)
obeyed his will. And so great Atreus yields to greater fame of Agamemnon, Aegeus yields to Theseus, and Peleus to Achilles, or, to name a parallel befitting these two gods, so Saturn yields to Jove. Now Jupiter rules in high heavens and is the suzerain over the waters and the world of shades, and now Augustus rules in all the lands— so each is both a father and a god. Gods who once guarded our Aeneas, when both swords and fire gave way, and native gods of Italy, and Father Quirinus— patron of Rome, and you Gradivus too— the sire of Quirinus the invincible, and Vesta hallowed among Caesar's gods, and Phoebus ever worshipped at his hearth, and Jupiter who rules the citadel high on Tarpeia's cliff, and other gods— all gods to whom a poet rightfully and with all piety may make appeal; far be that day—postponed beyond our time, when great Augustus shall foresake the earth which he now governs, and mount up to heaven, from that far height to hear his people's prayers! And now, I have comp