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Polybius, Histories 602 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 226 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 104 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 102 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 92 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 1 90 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 80 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 80 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 78 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan). You can also browse the collection for Rome (Italy) or search for Rome (Italy) in all documents.

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C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , THE SUPPLEMENT of DIONYSIUS VOSSIUS TO CAESAR'S FIRST BOOK of THE CIVIL WAR. (search)
rrival in Lombardy, thought proper, for many reasons, to send deputies to Rome, to demand the consulship, and a prolongation of his command. Pompey, who of the privilege of Roman citizens, seized one of their chief magistrates at Rome, ordered him to be scourged, and then dismissed him to carry his complain interest; finding at length all his endeavours without effect, fled from Rome, to avoid the malice of his enemies, and informed Caesar of all that was ted his readiness, if such was the resolution of the senate and people of Rome, to dismiss his army, provided Pompey did the same: but could by no meansed to carry this letter, who travelling with incredible despatch, reached Rome in three days (a distance of a hundred and sixty miles,) before the begin
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 2 (search)
ment, to take away all occasion of discord; because Caesar had reason to fear, as two of his legions had been taken from him, that Pompey retained them in the neighbourhood of Rome, with a view to employ them against him." M. Rufus nearly agreed with Callidius. But they were all severely reprimanded by the consul Lentulus, who expressly refused to put Callidius's motion to the vote. Marcellus, awed by the consul's reprimand, retracted what he had said. Thus the clamours of Lentulus, the dread of an army at the gates of Rome, and the menaces of Pompey's friends, forced the greater part of the senate, though with the utmost reluctance and dislike, into a compliance with Scipio's motion: " That Caesar should be ordered to disband
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 3 (search)
e of his party, commended the forward; confirmed them in their resolutions; reproved and animated the more moderate. Multitudes of veterans, who had formerly served under him, flocked to him from all parts, allured by the expectation of rewards and dignities. A great number of officers belonging to the two legions lately returned by Caesar, had likewise orders to attend him. Rome was filled with troops. Curio assembled the tribunes to support the decree of the people. On the other hand, all the friends of the consuls, all the partizans of Pompey, and of such as bore any ancient grudge to Caesar, repaired to the senate: by whose concourse and votes the weaker sort were terrified, the irresolute confirmed, and the greater part deprived of the liberty o
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 5 (search)
seditious tribunes never began to apprehend themselves in danger, till towards the eighth month of their administration. Recourse was had to that rigid and ultimate decree which was never used but in the greatest extremities, when the city was threatened with ruin and conflagration: "That the consuls, the pretors, the tribunes of the people, and the proconsuls that were near Rome, should take care that the commonwealth received no detriment." This decree passed the seventh of January; so that during the first five days in which it was permitted the senate to assemble, after Lentulus's entrance upon the consulship, (for two days are always appropriated to the holding of the comitia,) the most severe and rigorous resolutions were taken, both in relatio
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 6 (search)
ere by no means satisfied with their general; nay, had even refused to support and follow him. It was then proposed in the senate, that troops should be raised over all Italy; that Faustus Sylla should be sent propretor into Mauritania; that Pompey should be supplied with money out of the public treasury, and that king Juba should be declared friend and ally of the people of Rome: but Marcellus opposed the last of these; and Philippus, tribune of the people, would not agree to the propretorship of Sylla. The other motions were approved by the senate. The affair of the provinces was next decided; two of which were consular, the rest pretorian. Syria fell to the share of Scipio, and Gaul fell to L. Domitius. Philippus and Marcellus were set aside, thro
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 9 (search)
to mighty differences, and deliver all Italy from the fear of a civil war. He told them "That the interest of the commonwealth had always been dearer to him than life; but he could not help grieving at the malice of his enemies, who had frustrated the good intentions of the Roman people in his favour, by cutting off six months from his command, and obliging him to return to Rome to sue for the consulship, though a law had been made dispensing with his personal attendance; that he had yet, for the sake of the commonwealth, patiently submitted to this assault upon his honour; that even his proposal of disbanding the armies on both sides, which he had made by a letter to the senate, had been rejected: that new levies were making over all Italy: that tw
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 14 (search)
These things being reported at Rome, the consternation was so great over the whole city, that when the consul Lentulus came to the treasury, to deliver out the money to Pompey, in consequence of the decree of the sepate, he scarce waited the opening of the inner door, but precipitately left the place, upon a false rumour, that Caesar was approaching, and some of his cavalry already in view. He was soon followed by his colleague Marcellus, and the greater part of the magistrates, Pompey had left the town the day before, and was upon his way to Apulia, where he had quartered the legions he had received from Caesar. The levies were discontinued within the city, and no place appeared secure on this side Capua. Here, at last, they took courage and r
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 32 (search)
These affairs despatched, Caesar that his troops might enjoy some repose, cantoned them in the nearest towns, and set out himself for Rome. There he assembled the senate, and after complaining of the injuries of his enemies, told them, "That he had never affected extraordinary honours, but waited patiently the time prescribed by the laws, to solicit for a second consulship, to which every Roman citizen had a right to aspire: that the people, with the concurrence of their tribunes, (in spite of the attempts of his enemies, and the vigorous opposition of Cato, who endeavoured, according to custom, to spin out the time in speaking,) had permitted him to stand candidate though absent, and that even in the consulship of Pompey; who, if he disapproved of
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 33 (search)
iked the proposal of a deputation to Pompey; but the great difficulty was, to find deputies; every one, out of fear, refusing to charge himself with that commission. For Pompey, at his departure from Rome, had declared in the senate, "That he would esteem those who stayed beind, as no less guilty than those in Caesar's camp." Thus three days were spent in debates and excuses. The Caesar's camp." Thus three days were spent in debates and excuses. The tribune L. Metellus had likewise been suborned by Caesar's enemies to traverse his design, and hinder whatever he should propose. Which Caesar coming to understand, and that he only wasted his time to no purpose; he set out from Rome, without effecting what he intended, and arrived in farther Gaul.
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OF THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 34 (search)
same who, a few days before, had been made prisoner at Corfinium, and set at liberty by Caesar; that Domitius was gone to take possession of Marseilles, with seven galleys, which he had fitted out at Igilium and Cosanum, and manned with his slaves, freedmen, and labourers; that the deputies of the above-mentioned state, young men of the first quality, (whom Pompey, at his departure from Rome, had exhorted not to suffer the memory of his past services to their country to be blotted out by those lately received from Caesar,) had been sent before, to prepare the way for his reception. In consequence of their remonstrances, the inhabitants of Marseilles shut their gates against Caesar, and summoned to their assistance the Albici, a barbarous people, who had long bee
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