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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Sestos or search for Sestos in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 4, Contrast between Byzantium and Calchedon (search)
he first time levied customs on ships sailing into the Pontus,Xenophon, Hellen. 1, 1, 22.—and then drift down the current, which carries them as a matter of course to Byzantium. And the same is the case with a voyage on either side of Byzantium. For if a man is running before a south wind from the Hellespont, or to the Hellespont from the Pontus before the Etesian winds, if he keeps to the European shore, he has a direct and easy course to the narrow part of the Hellespont between Abydos and Sestos, and thence also back again to Byzantium: but if he goes from Calchedon along the Asiatic coast, the case is exactly the reverse, from the fact that the coast is broken up by deep bays, and that the territory of Cyzicus projects to a considerable distance. Nor can a man coming from the Hellespont to Calchedon obviate this by keeping to the European coast as far as Byzantium, and then striking across to Calchedon; for the current and other circumstances which I have mentioned make it difficul
Polybius, Histories, book 4, The War between Rhodes and Byzantium Begins (search)
one else's hands a point of vantage to be used against merchants sailing into the Pontus, or one which commanded the slave trade, or the fishing. Besides this, Prusias had seized in Asia a district of Mysia, which had been in the possession of Byzantium for many years past. Meanwhile the Rhodians manned six ships and received four from their allies; and, having elected Xenophantus to command them, they sailed with this squadron of ten ships to the Hellespont. Nine of them dropped anchor near Sestos, and stopped ships sailing into the Pontus; with the tenth the admiral sailed to Byzantium, to test the spirit of the people, and see whether they were already sufficiently alarmed to change their minds about the war. Finding them resolved not to listen he sailed away, and, taking up his other nine ships, returned to Rhodes with the whole squadron. Meanwhile the Byzantines sent a message to Achaeus asking for aid, and an escort to conduct Tiboetes from Macedonia. For it was believed that Ti