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Andocides, Speeches 78 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 10 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 10 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Peace (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.). You can also browse the collection for Sparta (Greece) or search for Sparta (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 801 (search)
taerus First give our city a great and famous name, then sacrifice to the gods. Euelpides I think so too. Leader of the Chorus Let's see. What shall our city be called? Pisthetaerus Will you have a high-sounding Laconian name? Shall we call it Sparta? Euelpides What! call my town Sparta? Why, I would not use esparto for my bed, even though I had nothing but bands of rushes. Pisthetaerus Well then, what name can you suggest? Euelpides Some name borrowed from the clouds, from these lofty reSparta? Why, I would not use esparto for my bed, even though I had nothing but bands of rushes. Pisthetaerus Well then, what name can you suggest? Euelpides Some name borrowed from the clouds, from these lofty regions in which we dwell —in short, some well-known name. Pisthetaerus Do you like Nephelococcygia? Leader of the Chorus Oh! capital! truly that's a brilliant thought! Euelpides Is it in Nephelococcygia that all the wealth of Theogenes and most of Aeschines' is? Pisthetaerus No, it's rather the plain of Phlegra, where the gods withered the pride of the sons of the Earth with their shafts. Leader of the Chorus Oh! what a splendid city! But what god shall be its patron? for whom shall we weave
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 989 (search)
the least. Meton With the straight ruler I set to work to inscribe a square within this circle; in its center will be the market-place, into which all the straight streets will lead, converging to this center like a star, which, although only orbicular, sends forth its rays in a straight line from all sides. Pisthetaerus A regular Thales! Meton . . . Meton What d'you want with me? Pisthetaerus I want to give you a proof of my friendship. Use your legs. Meton Why, what have I to fear? Pisthetaerus It's the same here as in Sparta. Strangers are driven away, and blows rain down as thick as hail. Meton Is there sedition in your city? Pisthetaerus No, certainly not. Meton What's wrong then? Pisthetaerus We are agreed to sweep all quacks and impostors far from our borders. Meton Then I'll be going. Pisthetaerus I'm afraid it's too late. The thunder growls already. He beats him. Meton Oh, woe! oh, woe! Pisthetaerus I warned you. Now, be off, and do your surveying somewhere else.
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 1263 (search)
ous, very gracious, thrice happy, very ... Come, prompt me, somebody, do Pisthetaerus Get to your story! Herald All peoples are filled with admiration for your wisdom, and they award you this golden crown. Pisthetaerus I accept it. But tell me, why do the people admire me? Herald Oh you, who have founded so illustrious a city in the air, you know not in what esteem men hold you and how many there are who burn with desire to dwell in it. Before your city was built, all men had a mania for Sparta; long hair and fasting were held in honor, men went dirty like Socrates and carried staves. Now all is changed. Firstly, as soon as it's dawn, they all spring out of bed together to go and seek their food, the same as you do; then they fly off towards the notices and finally devour the decrees. The bird-madness is so clear that many actually bear the names of birds. There is a halting victualler, who styles himself the partridge; Menippus calls himself the swallow; Opuntius the one-eyed crow