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Andocides, Speeches 78 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 10 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 10 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Peace (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham). You can also browse the collection for Sparta (Greece) or search for Sparta (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 1, chapter 13 (search)
But inasmuch as happiness is a certain activity of soul in conformity with perfect virtue, it is necessary to examine the nature of virtue. For this will probably assist us in our investigation of the nature of happiness. Also, the true statesman seems to be one who has made a special study of goodness, since his aim is to make the citizens good and law-abiding men—witness the lawgivers of Crete and Sparta, and the other great legislators of history; but if the study of virtue falls within the province of Political Science, it is clear that in investigating virtue we shall be keeping to the plan which we laid down at the outset. Now the goodness that we have to consider is clearly human virtue, since the good or happiness which we set out to seek is human good and human happiness. But human virtue means in our view excellence of soul, not excellence of body; also our definition of happiness is an activity of the soul. Now if this is
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 4, chapter 3 (search)
ncorrect recollection of Hom. Il. 1.393 ff., Hom. Il. 1.503 f.; there Achilles says that his mother has often reminded Zeus how she rescued him when the other gods wished to put him in chains; and Thetis goes to Zeus and reminds him of her services in general terms. not specify her services to Zeus; nor did the Spartans treating with the AtheniansThe reference is uncertain. recall the occasions when Sparta had aided Athens, but those on which Athens had aided Sparta. ncorrect recollection of Hom. Il. 1.393 ff., Hom. Il. 1.503 f.; there Achilles says that his mother has often reminded Zeus how she rescued him when the other gods wished to put him in chains; and Thetis goes to Zeus and reminds him of her services in general terms. not specify her services to Zeus; nor did the Spartans treating with the AtheniansThe reference is uncertain. recall the occasions when Sparta had aided Athens, but those on which Athens had aided Sparta.
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 9, chapter 6 (search)
bond of friendship. Concord is said to prevail in a state, when the citizens agree as to their interests, adopt the same policy, and carry their common resolves into execution. Concord then refers to practical ends, and practical ends of importance, and able to be realized by both or all the parties: for instance, there is concord in the state when the citizens unanimously decree that the offices of state shall be elective, or that an alliance shall be made with Sparta, or that Pittacus shall be dictator (when Pittacus was himself willing to be dictatorPittacus was elected dictator of Mitylene early in the sixth century B.C.; he ruled for fourteen years, and then laid down his office. All the citizens wished him to continue, but this was not strictly unanimity or Concord, since there was one dissentient, Pittacus himself.). When each of two persons wishes himself to rule, like the rivalsEteocles and Polyneices. in the Phoen
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 10, chapter 9 (search)
invested with adequate sanctions. Now paternal authority has not the power to compel obedience, nor indeed, speaking generally, has the authority of any individual unless he be a king or the like; but law on the other hand is a rule, emanating from a certain wisdom and intelligence, that has compulsory force. Men are hated when they thwart people's inclinations, even though they do so rightly, whereas law can enjoin virtuous conduct without being invidious. But Sparta appears to be the only or almost the only state in which the lawgiver has paid attention to the nurture and exercises of the citizens; in most states such matters have been entirely neglected, and every man lives as he likes, in Cyclops fashion ‘laying down the law For children and for spouse.’Hom. Od. 9.114 f., quoted in Aristot. Pol. 1252b 22. The best thing is then that there should be a proper system of public regulation; but when the matter is ne