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Pausanias, Description of Greece 118 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 64 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 44 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 4 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Georgics (ed. J. B. Greenough) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Poetics, section 1460a (search)
made up of inexplicable details; so far as possible there should be nothing inexplicable, or, if there is, it should lie outside the story—as, for instance, Oedipus not knowing how Laius died—and not in the play; for example, in the Electra the news of the Pythian games,In Sophocles'Electrathe plot hinges on a false story of Orestes' death by an accident at the Pythian games. Presumably the anachronism shocked Aristotle. or in the Mysians the man who came from Tegea to Mysia without speaking.Telephus. To say that the plot would otherwise have been ruined is ridiculous. One should not in the first instance construct such a plot, and if a poet does write thus, and there seems to be a more reasonable way of treating the incident, then it is positively absurd. Even in the Odyssey the inexplicable elements in the story of his landingHom. Od. 13.116ff. It seemed to the critics inexplicable that Odysseus should not awake