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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, Iliad 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, Iliad. You can also browse the collection for Tenedos or search for Tenedos in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, Iliad, Book 1, line 33 (search)
So he spoke, and the old man was seized with fear and obeyed his word. He went forth in silence along the shore of the loud-resounding sea, and earnestly then, when he had gone apart, the old man prayedto the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore: Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god,1 if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats,fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver.The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs,but then on the men the
Homer, Iliad, Book 1, line 428 (search)
o the daughter of Chryses from the sea-faring ship. Her then did Odysseus of many wiles lead to the altar,and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him: Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire:ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestile