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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 14 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Thisbe or search for Thisbe in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 4, line 1 (search)
peaking novel thoughts may lighten labour. Let us each in turn, relate to an attentive audience, a novel tale; and so the hours may glide.” it pleased her sisters, and they ordered her to tell the story that she loved the most. So, as she counted in her well-stored mind the many tales she knew, first doubted she whether to tell the tale of Derceto,— that Babylonian, who, aver the tribes of Palestine, in limpid ponds yet lives,— her body changed, and scales upon her limbs; or how her daughter, having taken wings, passed her declining years in whitened towers. Or should she tell of Nais, who with herbs, too potent, into fishes had transformed the bodies of her lovers, till she met herself the same sad fate; or of that tree which sometime bore white fruit, but now is changed and darkened by the blood that stained its roots.— Pleased with the novelty of this, at once she tells the tale of Pyramus and Thisbe;— and swiftly as she told it unto them, the fleecy wool was twisted into
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 4, line 55 (search)
nd the tardy night arises from the spot where day declines. Quickly, the clever Thisbe having first deceived her parents, opened the closed door. She flitted in the sthing jaws incarnadined with blood of slaughtered oxen. As the moon was bright, Thisbe could see her, and affrighted fled with trembling footstep to a gloomy cave; an on her way, and full of rage, tore it and stained it with her bloody jaws: but Thisbe, fortunate, escaped unseen. Now Pyramus had not gone out so soon as Thisbe to tThisbe to the tryst; and, when he saw the certain traces of that savage beast, imprinted in the yielding dust, his face went white with fear; but when he found the veil covered s the roots soaked up the blood the pendent mulberries were dyed a purple tint. Thisbe returned, though trembling still with fright, for now she thought her lover musfate has taken thy life away? Pyramus! Pyramus! awake! awake! It is thy dearest Thisbe calls thee! Lift thy drooping head! Alas,”—At Thisbe's name he raised his eyes,