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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). You can also browse the collection for Tibur (Italy) or search for Tibur (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 7, line 601 (search)
d; Saturnia swung on their hinges the barred gates of war. ausonia from its old tranquillity bursts forth in flame. Foot-soldiers through the field run to and fro; and mounted on tall steeds the cavaliers in clouds of dust whirl by. All arm in haste. Some oil the glittering shield or javelin bright, or on the whetstone wear good axes to an edge, while joyful bands uplift the standards or the trumpets blow. Five mighty cities to their anvils bring new-tempered arms: Atina—martial name — proud Tibur, Ardea, Crustumium, and river-walled Antemnae, crowned with towers strong hollow helmets on their brows they draw and weave them willow-shields; or melt and mould corselets of brass or shining silver greaves; none now for pruning-hook or sacred plough have love or care: but old, ancestral swords for hardier tempering to the smith they bring. Now peals the clarion; through the legions pass the watchwords: the impatient yeoman takes his helmet from the idle roof-tree hung; while to his chariot
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 7, line 670 (search)
Then came twin brethren, leaving Tibur's keep (named from Tiburtus, brother of them twain) Catillus and impetuous Coras, youth of Argive seed, who foremost in the van pressed ever where the foemen densest throng: as when two centaurs, children of the cloud, from mountain-tops descend in swift career, the snows of Homole and Othrys leaving, while crashing thickets in their pathway fall.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 9, line 314 (search)
d with stealthy slaughter, he crept near the followers of Messapus, where he saw their camp-fire dying down, and tethered steeds upon the meadow feeding. Nisus then knew the hot lust of slaughter had swept on too far, and cried, “Hold off! For, lo, the monitory dawn is nigh. Revenge has fed us to the full. We have achieved clean passage through the foe.” Full many a prize was left untaken: princely suits of mail enwrought with silver pure, huge drinking-bowls, and broideries fair. Yet grasped Euryalus the blazonry at Rhamnes' corselet hung, and belt adorned with gold: which were a gift to Remulus of Tibur from the store of opulent Caedicus, who sued from far to be a friend; and these in death he gave to his son's son, who slain in battle fell, and proud Rutulians seized them with the spoil. Euryalus about his shoulder strong this booty slung—unprofitable gain! — and fitted on a gorgeous, crested helm which once Messapus wore. So from the camp, escaping danger, the two champio