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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Tibur (Italy) or search for Tibur (Italy) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 70 (search)
coast, and the islands of Campania,Such as Baiae, and the islands of Ischia, Procida, Capri, and others; the resorts of the opulent nobles, where they had magnificent marine villas. or the towns nearest the city, such as Lanuvium, Praeneste, and Tibur,Now Tivoli, a delicious spot, where Horace had a villa, in which he hoped to spend his declining years. Ver ubi longum, tepidasque praebet Jupiter brumas: … … ibi, tu calentem Debit sparges lachryma favillam Vatis amici. Odes, B. ii. 5. Adrian also had a magnificent villa near Tibur. where he often used to sit for the administration of justice, in the porticos of the temple of Hercules. He had a particular aversion to large and sumptuous palaces; and some which had been raised at a vast expense by his grand-daughter, Julia, he leveled to the ground. Those of his own, which were far from being spacious, he adorned, not so much with statues and pictures, as with walks and groves, and things which were curious either for their antiqu
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 80 (search)
ic nations, the habit of covering the lower extremities, barbarous as it had been held, was geerally adopted. In summer, he lay with the doors of his bedchamber open, and frequently in a piazza, refreshed by a bubbling fountain, and a person standing by to fan him. He could not bear even the winter's sun; and at home, never walked in the open air without a broad-brimmed hat on his head. He usually travelled in a litter, and by night; and so slow, that he was two days in going to Praeneste or Tibur. And if he could go to any place by sea, he preferred that mode of travelling. He carefully nourished his health against his many infirmities, avoiding chiefly the free use of the bath; but he was often rubbed with oil, and sweated in a stove; after which he was washed with tepid water, warmed either by a fire, or by being exposed to the heat of the sun. When, upon account of his nerves, he was obliged to have recourse to sea-water, or the waters of Albula,Albula. On the left of the road to
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 63 (search)
Amidst these enormities, in how much fear and apprehension, as well as odium and detestation, he lived, is evident from many indications. He forbade the soothsayers to be consulted in private, and without some witnesses being present. He attempted to suppress the oracles in the neighbourhood of the city; but being terrified by the divine authority of the Praenestine Lots,There were oracles at Antium and Tibur. The " Pranestine Lots" are described by Cicero, De Divin. xi. 41. he abandoned the design. For though they were sealed up in a box, and carried to Rome, yet they were not to be found in it until it was returned to the temple. More than one person of consular rank, appointed governors of provinces, he never ventured to dismiss to their respective destinations, but kept them until several years after, when he nominated their successors, while they still remained present with him. In the meantime they bore the title of their office; and he frequently gave them orders, which they t
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 8 (search)
rom the number of places which are said to have given him birth. Cneius Lentulus GaetulicusIt does not appear that Gaetulicus wrote any historical work, but Martial, Pliny, and others, describe him as a respectable poet. says that he was born at Tibur; Pliny the younger, in the country of the Treviri, at a village called Ambiatinus, above Confluentes;Supra Confluentes; The German tribe here mentioned occupied the country between the Rhine and the Meuse, and gave their name to Treves (Treviri), young prince, by giving him the lustre of being born in a city sacred to Hercules; and says that he advanced this false assertion with the more assurance, because, the year before the birth of Caius, Germanicus had a son of the same name born at Tibur; concerning whose amiable childhood and premature death I have already spoken.Chap. vii. Dates clearly prove that Pliny is mistaken; for the writers of Augustus's history all agree, that Germanicus, at the expiration of his consulship, was sent i
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 21 (search)
He completed the works which were left unfinished by Tiberius, namely, the temple of Augustus, and the theatre of Pompey.See TIBERIUS, c. xlvii. and AUGUSTUS, c. xxxi. He began, likewise, the aqueduct from the neighbourhood of Tibur,This aqueduct, commenced by Caligula and completed by Claudian, a truly imperial work, conveyed the waters of two streams to Rome, following the valley of the Anio from above Tivoli. The course of one of these rivulets was forty miles, and it was carried on arches, immediately after quitting its source, for a distance of three miles. The other, the Anio Novus, also began on arches, which continued for upwards of twelve miles. After this, both were conveyed under ground; but at the distance of six miles from the city, they were united, and carried upon arches all the rest of the way. This is the most perfect of all the ancient aqueducts; and it has been repaired, so as to convey the Acqua Felice, one of the three streams which now supply Rome. See CLAUDIU