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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 332 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 1 256 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 210 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 188 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 178 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 164 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 112 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 84 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 82 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs). You can also browse the collection for Troy (Turkey) or search for Troy (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 22 document sections:

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Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 957 (search)
ame but so that if you should give me the chance to talk to you, as you are now doing, I might escort you from this house. For you were mine to begin with, and you are married to Neoptolemus only by the baseness of your father. Before he attacked Troy, he gave you to me to be my wife, but later he promised you to your present husband as a reward if he sacked Troy. When Achilles' son came home to this land, I forgave your father, but Neoptolemus I begged to relinquish his marriage to you. I tolTroy. When Achilles' son came home to this land, I forgave your father, but Neoptolemus I begged to relinquish his marriage to you. I told him of my evil fortunes and my present fate, how I could marry the daughter of a kindred house but only with difficulty one from outside because of the exile from country that I am suffering. But he was haughty and spoke insultingly to me about the murder of my mother and the goddesses whose eyes drip blood.The Erinyes, who pursue Orestes for the murder of his mother. Since I was humiliated because of my troubles at home, I put up with my misfortune, though in great pain, and went away again
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 1009 (search)
Chorus O Phoebus, who built high the fair-walled rock of Troy, and you, Lord of the Deep, who ride your chariot with horses the color of the sea over the salt main, why did you deprive your hand of its cunning craftsmanship, and put it at the service of Ares, Lord of the Spear, and thereby let slip luckless, luckless Troy? Chorus O Phoebus, who built high the fair-walled rock of Troy, and you, Lord of the Deep, who ride your chariot with horses the color of the sea over the salt main, why did you deprive your hand of its cunning craftsmanship, and put it at the service of Ares, Lord of the Spear, and thereby let slip luckless, luckless Troy?
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 1173 (search)
Peleus Ah me, what disaster is this I see and take in my hands into my house! Oh, alas! City of Thessaly, I am undone, I am perished, none of my race, no children, are left for me in my house! Oh how wretched misfortune has made me! To what friend shall I look for consolation? O face that I love and knees and hands, would that the god had killed you beneath Troy's walls by the bank of the Simois!
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 284 (search)
Chorus When the goddesses came to the shady glen, in the streams of mountain springs they bathed their radiant bodies, and then vying with each other in extravagant words of malicious intent they came to the son of Priam. Aphrodite was victorious by her wheedling words, delightful to hear but entailing bitter destruction for the luckless city of the Phrygians, the citadel of Troy.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 788 (search)
Chorus O aged son of Aeacus, I am convinced that with your illustrious spear you joined battle at the side of the Lapiths against the Centaurs and that on board the Argo you traversed the inhospitable waters of the sea-going Symplegades on a voyage of fame, and when on that earlier day Zeus' famous son Heracles encircled with destruction the city of Troy, you came back to Europe with your share in this high renown.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 693 (search)
rd this as the deed of those who have done the work, but rather the general receives the honor. He brandished his spear as one man among countless others and did no more than a single warrior, yet he gets more credit. [And sitting high and mighty in office in the city they think grander thoughts than the commons though they are worthless. The people are far superior to them in wisdom if they acquired at once daring and will.] It is in this fashion that you and your brother sit puffed up over Troy and your generalship there, made high and mighty by the toils and labors of others. But I will teach you not to regard Paris, shepherd of Mount Ida, a greater enemy to you than Peleus unless you clear off from this house at once, you and your childless daughter. This child, offspring of my loins, shall drive her through this house, grasping her by the hair, if she, sterile heifer that she is, does not put up with others' having children just because she herself has none. If her luck in resp
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 866 (search)
Nurse My child, I did not praise your excessiveness when you committed your crime against the woman of Troy nor do I now praise your present excessive fear. Your husband will not, as you think, end his marriage to you, won over by the insignificant words of a barbarian woman. For you are not his as a prisoner taken from Troy, but he has received you with a large dowry and you are the daughter of a man of importance and come from a city of no ordinary prosperity. Your father will not, as you fTroy, but he has received you with a large dowry and you are the daughter of a man of importance and come from a city of no ordinary prosperity. Your father will not, as you fear, abandon you and allow you to be banished from this house. But go inside and do not show yourself in front of this house lest you disgrace yourself [being seen in front of these halls, my daughter]. Enter by Eisodos B Orestes in travelling costume. Chorus Leader Look, here comes a stranger, a man of different hue from ourselves, hastening towards us with speedy step. Orestes Ladies who dwell in this foreign land, is this the house of Achilles' son and his royal residence? Chorus Leader
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 425 (search)
m deceived! Menelaus Tell the whole world! I shall not deny it. Andromache Do you dwellers by the Eurotas find this clever? Menelaus Yes, just as do dwellers in Troy: it is called revenge. Andromache Are not the gods divine, do you not think they punish? Menelaus I'll bear that when it comes. But you I shall kill. Andromachuplicity being constantly unmasked? My curse upon you! The death-sentence you have passed on me is not so grievous. I was undone long ago when the unhappy city of Troy was destroyed and my glorious husband killed, whose spear often changed you from a plague on land to one on shipboard. And now you appear against a woman in grim wd are killing me. Kill on! For I shall leave you without uttering one word of truckling flattery to you or your daughter. For though you are great in Sparta, yet I was great in Troy, and if my fortune now is evil, do not make this your boast: yours may be so as well.Exit Andromache, Molossus, Menelaus, and retinue into the house.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 352 (search)
riage, and in his eyes I incur no less a penalty than in yours if I afflict his line with childlessness. That is the way I am. As for your nature, there is one thing I fear: it was in the matter of a female quarrel that you also destroyed unhappy Troy. Chorus Leader You have spoken too much as a women to a man, and has hurled forth sober judgment from your mind. Menelaus Woman, these things are, as you say, trifles and not worthy of my kingly power or of Greece. But make no mistake, whatever an individual happens to desire, that becomes for him greater than the conquest of Troy. I have become the fixed ally of my daughter, for I think it is a serious matter to be deprived of sex. Any other misfortunes a woman may suffer are secondary, but if she loses her husband she loses her life. Neoptolemus must rule over my slaves, and my kin—and I myself as well—must rule over his. For friends have no private property but hold all things in common. And i
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 384 (search)
rs have I set fire to? I went to bed against my will with my master: will you then kill me rather than him, the man who is to blame? Will you let go the cause and attack the effect that came after? Alas for my misery! O my unhappy fatherland, what injustice I suffer! Why must I even have given birth and doubled the burden I bear? [But why do I lament these things but do not consider to their last drop the misfortunes immediately before me?] I saw Hector dragged to death behind a chariot and Troy put piteously to the torch, and I myself went, pulled by the hair, as a slave to the Argive ships. And when I came to Phthia, I was made the bride of Hector's slayer. How can life be sweet for me? To what shall I look? To my past or my present fate? I had left a single son, the eye of my life: those who have decided these things mean to kill him. But no, not to save my wretched life! If he survives he bears our hopes, while for me not to die on behalf of my child is a reproach. She leaves t
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