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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 332 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 1 256 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 210 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 188 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 178 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 164 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 112 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 84 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 82 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Laws. You can also browse the collection for Troy (Turkey) or search for Troy (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 682d (search)
AthenianAnd after a stay of ten years the Achaeans sacked Troy.CliniasVery true.AthenianNow during this period of ten years, while the siege lasted, the affairs of each of the besiegers at home suffered much owing to the seditious conduct of the young men. For when the soldiers returned to their own cities and homes,
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 683a (search)
about which you said truly that it and Crete were settled under kindred laws. From the wandering course of our argument, and our excursion through various polities and settlements, we have now gained this much: we have discerned a first, a second and a third State,i.e., (I) the family or clan, under patriarchal “headship”; (2) the combination of clans under an aristocracy (or monarchy); (3) the “mixed” state (or “city of the plain,” like Troy); and (4) the confederacy, consisting, in the example, of three States leagued together. all, as we suppose, succeeding one another in the settlements which took place during vast ages of time. And now there has emerged this fourth State—or “nation,” if you so prefer—which was once upon a time in course of establishment and
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 685c (search)
it had been in the reign of Ninus. The mythical founder of the Assyrian empire, husband of Semiramis, and builder of Nineveh (dated about 2200 B.C.). For much of the splendor of that empire still survived and the people of that age stood in fear of its confederate power, just as we men of today dread the Great King. For since Troy was a part of the Assyrian empire, the secondThe first “capture” was by Heracles, in the reign of Laomedon, father of Priam. Cp. Hom. Il. 5.640 ff. capture of Troy it had been in the reign of Ninus. The mythical founder of the Assyrian empire, husband of Semiramis, and builder of Nineveh (dated about 2200 B.C.). For much of the splendor of that empire still survived and the people of that age stood in fear of its confederate power, just as we men of today dread the Great King. For since Troy was a part of the Assyrian empire, the secondThe first “capture” was by Heracles, in the reign of Laomedon, father of Priam. Cp. Hom. Il. 5.640 ff. capture of Troy
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 685d (search)
formed a grave charge against the Greeks. It was in view of all this that the Dorian host was at that time organizes and distributed amongst three States under brother princes, the sons of Heraclesviz., Temenus, king of Argos, Procles and Eurystheus of Laconia, Cresphontes of Messene.; and men thought it admirably devised, and in its equipment superior even to the host that had sailed to Troy. For men reckoned, first, that in the sons of Heracles they had better chiefs than the Pelopidae,viz., Agamemnon and Menelaus. and further,
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 685e (search)
that this army was superior in valor to the army which went to Troy, since the latter, which was Achaean, was worsted by the former, which was Dorian. Must we not suppose that it was in this way, and with this intention, that the men of that age organized themselves?MegillusCertainly.AthenianIs it not also probable that they would suppose this to be a stable arrangement, and likely to continue quite a long time,