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P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 332 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 1 256 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 210 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 188 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 178 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 164 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 112 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 84 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 82 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb). You can also browse the collection for Troy (Turkey) or search for Troy (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 13 document sections:

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Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 54 (search)
illes, not worthy to receive them—even though you had come and were claiming them by right—but instead handed them over to Odysseus. Say what youwill of me—even the vilest of vile insults. You will not harm me at all by that. But if you fail to do as I say, you will inflict pain on all the Argives, for if that man's bow is not seized, you can never sack the realm of Dardanus.And learn why your intercourse with him may be free from mistrust and danger, while mine cannot. You have sailed to Troy under no oath to any man, nor under any constraint. Neither did you have any part in the earlier expedition. I, however, can deny none of these things. Accordingly, if heperceives me while he is still master of his bow, I am dead, and you, as my comrade, will share my doom. No, the thing for which we must devise a ruse is just this: how you may steal his invincible weapons. Well I know, my son, that by nature you are not aptto utter or contrive such treachery. Yet knowing that victory <
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 86 (search)
falsehood yields deliverance. Neoptolemus And with what expression on his face will anyone dare mouth those lies? Odysseus When what you do promises gain, it is wrong to shrink back. Neoptolemus And what gain is it for me that he should come to Troy? Odysseus His arrows alone will capture Troy. Neoptolemus Then I am not to be the conqueror, as you said? Odysseus Neither will you be without them, nor they without you. Neoptolemus It would seem, then, that we must track them down, if thingsTroy. Neoptolemus Then I am not to be the conqueror, as you said? Odysseus Neither will you be without them, nor they without you. Neoptolemus It would seem, then, that we must track them down, if things stand as you say. Odysseus Know that by doing this task, you win two rewards. Neoptolemus What are they? If I knew, I would not refuse the deed. Odysseus You will be celebrated in the same breath as clever and as noble. Neoptolemus So be it! I will do it, and cast off all shame. Odysseus Do you remember, then, the story that I recommended? Neoptolemus Be sure of it, since once and for all I have consented.
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 191 (search)
Neoptolemus No part of this is a marvel to me. God-sent—if a man such as I may judge—are both those sufferings which attacked him from savage Chryse,and those with which he now toils untended. Surely he toils by the plan of some god so that he may not bend against Troy the invincible arrows divine, until the time be fulfilled at which, men say,by those arrows Troy is fated to fall. Neoptolemus No part of this is a marvel to me. God-sent—if a man such as I may judge—are both those sufferings which attacked him from savage Chryse,and those with which he now toils untended. Surely he toils by the plan of some god so that he may not bend against Troy the invincible arrows divine, until the time be fulfilled at which, men say,by those arrows Troy is fated
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 343 (search)
mus They came for me in a ship elaborately ornamented, shining Odysseus, and he who fostered my father,and said—whether truly or falsely, I do not know—that since my father had perished, fate now forbade that anyone but I should take the towers of Troy. Saying that this, my friend, was how things stood, they caused me no long delay before I set sail in haste,chiefly because of my yearning for the dead, that I might look upon him before burial, since I had never seen him. Then, besides, theirs was a fine promise, if by accompanying them I might sack the towers of Troy. It was now the second day of my voyagewhen, sped by breeze and oar, I approached bitter Sigeum. When I landed, straightaway the entire army thronged around me with greetings, vowing that they saw their lost Achilles once more alive. He, though, lay ready for burial, and I, unhappy,when I had wept for him, went before long to the Atreids, to friends, as it was reasonable to suppose,—and claimed my father's arms and all<
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 591 (search)
nging spirit sent by the gods to exact payment for evil deeds? Merchant I will inform you of all that, since it seems that you have not heard. There was a seer of noble birth,a son of Priam, called Helenus, whom that man, out on a solitary night raid—that deceitful Odysseus, whose repute is all shame and dishonor—captured. Leading him back in bonds, he displayed him publicly to the Achaeans as his glorious prey.Helenus then prophesied for them whatever matter they asked, and, pertaining to Troy, he foretold that they would never sack its towers, unless by winning words they should bring Philoctetes here from the island where he now dwells. And, as soon as he heard the seer prophecy this, Laertes' sonimmediately promised that he would bring the man and show him to the Achaeans. He thought it most likely that he would get him willingly, but, if unwilling, then by force, and he added that, were he to fail in this, whoever wished it might sever his head.You have heard everything, boy,
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 893 (search)
leave me behind and sail away! Neoptolemus Leave you? No, not I. Rather, to your pain, I will bring you along. That is my torment. Philoctetes What do you mean, son? I do not understand. Neoptolemus I will conceal nothing. You must sail to Troy, back to the Achaeans and the forces of the Atreids. Philoctetes Ah, no! What have you said? Neoptolemus Do not wail in grief, before you understand! Philoctetes Understand what? What do you intend to do to me? Neoptolemus Save you, first, fnd what? What do you intend to do to me? Neoptolemus Save you, first, from this misery, and then,together with you, go and plunder Troy's plains. Philoctetes And this is your true intent? Neoptolemus A harsh necessity governs these events, so do not be angered at hearing of them. Philoctetes I am destroyed—ah, misery!—betrayed! What have you done to me, stranger? Return my bow at once! Neoptolemus No, it is not possible. My duty and my interest alike constrain me to obey those in po
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 927 (search)
of my life. Return it, I beg you, return it, I pray you, son! By the gods of your fathers, do not rob me of my life! Ah, me! He speaks to me no more.He looks away, as if he will never give it up! O you inlets and headlands, you wild creatures of the hills who have shared my life, and you jagged cliffs, to you—for you alone hear me—to you my accustomed companions,I bewail the treacherous treatment I have received from the son of Achilles. Although he swore to take me to my home, it is to Troy that he takes me. Although he gave me his right hand in pledge of his word, he has taken my bow, the sacred bow, once belonging to Zeus's son Heracles, and he keeps it, and wants to show it to the Argives as his own.By force he drags me away, as if he had captured a strong man, and does not see that he is cutting down a corpse, the shadow of smoke, a mere phantom. In my strength he could not have taken me—no!—nor even in my present condition, save by deceit. But now, because of my rotten
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 963 (search)
dled by Hephaestus, will you indeed endure it that this man should take me from your domain by force? Odysseus Zeus it is, I tell you, Zeus, who rules this land,and it is by Zeus that these actions are decreed. I am his servant. Philoctetes Hated creature, what clever pleading you devise! By sheltering yourself behind the gods, you make the gods liars. Odysseus No, but true prophets. Now our march must begin. Philoctetes Never! Odysseus Now, I say. You must obey. Philoctetes Ah, misery! Clearly, then, my father sired me to be a slave and no free man. Odysseus Not so, but to be the peer of the best and bravest, with whom you are destined to take Troy and force it to the ground. Philoctetes No, never—even if I must suffer every torment,so long as I have this island's steep cliffs beneath me! Odysseus What do you plan to do? Philoctetes Throw myself now from the rock and shatter my head on the rocks below! Odysseus Quick, seize him, both of you! Do not give him the chanc
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 1288 (search)
high! Philoctetes O welcome words—if your words are true! Neoptolemus The deed will soon make it plain. Come, stretch out your right hand and be master of your bow!As he hands the bow and arrows to Philoctetes, Odysseus suddenly appears. Odysseus But I forbid it, as the gods are my witnesses, in the name of the Atreids and the entire army! Philoctetes Son, whose voice was that? Do I hear Odysseus? Odysseus Be sure of it, and you see him at your side, who will carry you to the plains of Troy by force, whether or not the son of Achilles is willing. Philoctetes But it will bring you no joy, if this arrow fly straight.Odysseus flees from the stage. Neoptolemus Wait—by the gods, no! Do not let it fly! Philoctetes Let go of me, in the name of the gods, dear boy! Neoptolemus I will not. Philoctetes Alas! Why did you take from me the chance to kill my hated enemy with my bow? Neoptolemus It would have been honorable neither for me, nor for you. Philoctetes Well, you may be sure
Sophocles, Philoctetes (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 1314 (search)
ess,as long as the sun still rises in the east and sets in the west, until of your own free will you come to the plains of Troy, find there the sons of Asclepius, our comrades, be relieved of this infection, and, with this bow'said and mine, be hailed as the sacker of Troy's towers. How I know these things are so ordained, I will tell you. We have a Trojan prisoner, Helenus, foremost among seers, who says plainly that all this must come to pass, and further,that this very summer must see the complete capture of Troy. Otherwise he willingly gives himself over for execution, if these prophecies of his prove false. Therefore, now that you understand everything, give way graciously. It is a glorious addition to your gain to be singled o, now that you understand everything, give way graciously. It is a glorious addition to your gain to be singled outas best of the Greeks—first, for coming into healing hands, and then for taking Troy rich in tears, and so winning a matchless renow
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