Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Peter or search for Peter in all documents.

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nant Girardey commanding; Sarsfield Guards, Captain O'Hara, 16 men; Louisiana Grays, Capt W. C. Deane, 13 men. Total, 250. January 10th, the following companies, joking at their confined limits, left on board the towboat Yantic, the forts below the city being the objective point: Orleans battalion artillery (two companies), Captains Hebrard and Gomez, 57 men; First company Chasseurs-a-pied, Captain St. Paul, 44 men; Chasseurs d'orleans, Captain Hendolve, 15 men; the Jaegers (German), Captain Peter, 23 men; Lafayette Guards, 27 men. Total, 166; Maj. Paul E. Theard, Battalion d'artillerie, commanding. A third expedition, comprising members of that old and picturesque organization, the Continental Guards, Lieutenant Merriam commanding, stepped on board the Mobile mail boat, to stop short at Fort Pike at the Rigolets. No defense was offered against these triple movements. Each was backed by ample force. At each call, the arsenal at Baton Rouge, Forts Jackson, St. Philip and Pike
Louisiana artillery, although wounded early in the conflict, continued to render the most gallant service to the end. Of the same company, Lieutenant Baylor, of the 42-pounder barbette battery, and Lieutenant Agar deserve mention. Among those who acted coolly during the six days, were Lieutenants Ogden, Kennedy and Mumford, of the Louisiana artillery; Lieutenant Gaines, in command of the 32-pounder on the river front; Captain Jones, Company I, Twenty-third regiment Louisiana volunteers; Captain Peter, Company I, Twenty-second regiment volunteers; Lieut. Thomas K. Pierson, Twentythird regiment, who was killed while gallantly fighting his guns; Capt. M. T. Squires, senior officer at Fort St. Philip; and Lieut. Thomas B. Huger, of the McRae, who was seriously wounded. Speaking of the deserters, General Duncan, three weeks later, said: Scores of them have been daily going over to the enemy and enlisting since, until now there are but a very few left from either fort not in the ranks
nd several artillery organizations. Below is a roll of death, which Louisiana, deprived of brave sons by wounds received during the siege, signed in tears with her blood on July 4, 1863. Officers reported killed: Third Louisiana, Capt. J. E. Johnson, John Kinney, Lieut. A. S. Randolph; Twenty-first Louisiana, Capt. J. Ryan, Lieut. G. H. Mann; Twentysecond Louisiana, Capt. F. Gomez, Lieut. R. E. Lehman; Twenty-sixth Louisiana, Maj. W. W. Martin, Capt. Felix G. Winder, Lieuts. M. Arnaux, Peter Feriner; Twentysev-enth Louisiana, Lieut-Col. L. L. McLaurin, Lieut. Geo. Harris, Col. L. D. Marks, mortally wounded; Twentyeighth (Twenty-ninth) Louisiana, Capt. F. Newman, Lieuts. B. F. Millett, I. G. Sims; Thirty-first Louisiana, Col. S. H. Griffin; Seventeenth Louisiana, Lieut.-Col Madison Rogers. For heavy and light artillery alike, it was of truth a martial education to have stood within the defenses of Vicksburg during her historic siege. Not a man from the State but had proved br