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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 52 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Richard Peters or search for Richard Peters in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
surance, in which the application of the maxim, causa proxima non remota spectatur, was considered. The case in which Judge Story's adverse opinion was given was Peters v. Warren Insurance Company, 3 Sumner's Reports, 389; s. c. 14 Peters' Reports, 99. Lord Denman, writing to Sumner, Feb. 27, 1839, said: I am greatly obliged by yPeters' Reports, 99. Lord Denman, writing to Sumner, Feb. 27, 1839, said: I am greatly obliged by your communication of Judge Story's opinion, which excites a great doubt of the justice of ours; and again, Sept. 29, 1840, he said that if the point should arise again, the case of Peters v. The Warren Insurance Company will, at least, neutralize the effect of our decision, and induce any of our courts to consider the question as to the Queen's Bench in a letter to Mr. Justice Patteson, in Oct., 1840. Life of Lord Denman, Vol. II. p. 88. See ante, Vol. II. p. 25, note. The authority of Peters v. Warren Insurance Company has been somewhat shaken by later American cases. General Mutual Insurance Company v. Sherwood, 14 Howard Reports, 351; Mathews v. Ho
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
d the third of Mr. Maillard, now of California. In Philadelphia he received much attention from Joseph R. Ingersoll, and was warmly greeted by his old friends, Mr. Peters and family, who found him in presence and manners changed from the youth they had known six years before. At this time he formed a friendship with Theodore Sedey are blunt and heavy and without grace, but are full, learned, and able, with an extravagance of view that is not unnatural in a solitary student like him. Peters is here now. I have seen him at Nahant, where I was passing a few days. He seems as fresh as ever. We expect to be invaded by fifty thousand Whigs, who will repral as a child, wearing a queue. Harrison is Mr. Otis's old friend, the veteran of Philadelphia society (I do not know him personally), hospitable and kind. Richard Peters has recently lost his wife; he is very fond of society, gay, pleasant, and familiar for years with our public men. Joseph R. Ingersoll is in Washington. Pr
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
Columbia College, New York. of the American deserves great honor for the prompt and noble stand which he took against the doctrines of Mr. Webster's letter. His articles were admirable in spirit and matter. There is some professional learning which might have been introduced beyond what he embodied; but he handled the subject most ably. Judge Story tells me that, in delivering the opinion of the Supreme Court of the United States on this recent slave question, Prigg v. Pennsylvania, 16 Peters's Reports, p. 539. he has declared that, by the law of nations, we cannot require the surrender of fugitives; thus throwing the weight of our highest tribunal upon that of the English House of Lords. But trouble seems to arise now from the other question,—of the right of search. The recent debate in the French Chamber has aroused new feeling. General Cass has come into the lists with a pamphlet, in which he takes sides most violently with Stevenson; and he has carried with him the sympa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
him to the place, and fixed his salary at the rate of twelve hundred dollars a year. This was Sumner's last year of service in that capacity. Early in 1843, Mr. Peters lost the office of Reporter of the Supreme Court. Judge Story, when he foresaw that a change was likely to take place, consulted Sumner as to his wishes concer two months before his death:— With you, too, dear Charley, I sympathize and mourn over your disappointment in the hope you had of getting the place which Mr. Peters has vacated. It would have been a delightful office for you, and I had set my heart upon your obtaining it. I am the worst person in the world to preach coura, his extensive acquaintance, his large literary and personal correspondence, considerably impeded his progress as a lawyer. He would have been glad to succeed Mr. Peters as Reporter of the United States Supreme Court; and I know he was deeply disappointed that he was not offered a position in the Law School on the death of Judge
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
at I shall be tempted to address you a letter on the subject, which you may read to Mr. Berrien, Mr. Crittenden, or any others you may think it not improper to approach in this way. Hillard has already written to Mr. Bates; so has Mr. Lawrence to Mr. Crittenden. Mr. Dix, the new Senator from New York, I am told, is a gentleman of taste in art and letters. He is a warm friend of Crawford. Will Texas be admitted? We hear to-day that the chances are against the present resolutions. If Mr. Peters is still in Washington, remember me to him. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower he wrote, March 30, 1845:— At this moment, our City Government is imbecile,—being the miserable offspring of Native Americanism. It has so little of the confidence of the people that it cannot do much under the new Act; An Act authorizing the building of an aqueduct for the introduction of water into the city of Boston. and it is probable that no important steps will