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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
been (if found) five or six miles long. The only thing he ought to have done, or had time to do, was postponed almost twenty hours--the putting General Lee, who was near, in command of the army. The operations of the Confederate troops in this battle were very much retarded by the broad ponds of rain-water,--in many places more than knee-deep,--by the deep mud, and by the dense woods and thickets that covered the ground. Brigadier-General Hatton was among the killed, and Brigadier-Generals Pettigrew and Hampton were severely wounded. The latter kept his saddle, and served to the end of the action. Among the killed on the Williamsburg road were Colonels Moore, of Alabama, Jones, and Lomax. In the two days battle, the Confederate loss, so far as the reports indicate, was 6134 (including the loss in G. W. Smith's division, which was 1283); and the Federal loss, according to the revised returns, was 5031. Prisoners to the number of 350, 10 pieces of artillery, 6700 muskets
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
n, (w): 14th Ga.; 19th Ga.; 16th N. C.; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 284=329. Hatton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Hatton (k): 1st Tenn.; 7th Tenn.; 14th Tenn. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 187; m, 13 = 244. Pettigrew's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. J. Pettigrew (w and c): Arkansas Battalion; 35th Ga.; 22d N. C.; 47th Va. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 240; m, 54 == 341. The Official Records indicate that Semmes's and Griffith's brigades were in position for action, buBrig.-Gen. J. J. Pettigrew (w and c): Arkansas Battalion; 35th Ga.; 22d N. C.; 47th Va. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 240; m, 54 == 341. The Official Records indicate that Semmes's and Griffith's brigades were in position for action, but were not actually engaged. The total loss of the Left Wing, as reported by General Smith, was 164 killed, 1010 wounded, and 109 missing = 1283. The aggregate Confederate loss on May 31st and June 1st was 980 killed, 4749 wounded, and 405 missing = 6134. Relative strength of the opposing forces. The following synopsis, from the Records and other data, is by General Gustavus W. Smith: The Union Army numbered 98,008, of which about 5000 were on detached service: Present for duty, Sumn
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
rth of Fair Oaks commenced, when the head of Pettigrew's brigade reached the point in the large woompton, whose brigade had reached the rear of Pettigrew's. Generals Johnston and Whiting had gone onh would bring Hampton into line of battle on Pettigrew's left, in the attack General Johnston propoof battle formed by the brigades of Whiting, Pettigrew, and Hampton. In the meantime the action hah side of theNine-mile road. One regiment of Pettigrew's brigade, in reserve, was in the same field on the right, and learning that Hampton and Pettigrew were suffering great losses in the small woor. I therefore ordered Hatton's brigade and Pettigrew's reserve regiment to move into the woods anade to the extreme front line of Hampton and Pettigrew in the woods, and soon learned that General General Pettigrew had been wounded, it was supposed mortally, and was a prisoner. General Hatton was kille meantime Whiting's brigade and the right of Pettigrew's had been forced back to the clump of trees