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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 62 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for J. J. Pettigrew or search for J. J. Pettigrew in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
h, on the morning of the 30th, still in the advance, sent Pettigrew's brigade of his division forward from Cashtown to Gettyso secure a supply of shoes that he had heard were there. Pettigrew, approaching the suburbs of Gettysburg, unexpectedly cames of cavalry, having, as mentioned, caused the advance of Pettigrew's brigade to retire upon Cashtown, was at Gettysburg, wittil late in the day. Heth, bringing up the brigades of Pettigrew and Brockenborough, with the remnants of Archer's brigadeack, advanced his whole line, Brockenborough on the left, Pettigrew in the centre, and Archer on the right. Archer was soon nce from Stone and Meredith that he made no headway. But Pettigrew, although not without hard fighting and suffering heavy l officer were left. Perrin's brigade, advancing beyond Pettigrew, attacked Biddle, who, after a gallant resistance, was con on the right, and Heth's division, now under command of Pettigrew, held in reserve. During the morning, as Wilcox's, the
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
, 1863. I found Lee in a very strong position, intrenched. I hesitated to attack him, without some examination of the mode of approaching him. I called my corps commanders together, and they voted against attacking him. This morning, when I advanced to feel his position and seek for a weak point, I found he had retired in the night and was nearly across the river. I immediately started in pursuit, and my cavalry captured two thousand prisoners, two guns, several flags, and killed General Pettigrew. On reporting these facts to General Halleck, he informed me the President was very much dissatisfied at the escape of Lee. I immediately telegraphed I had done my duty to the best of my ability, and that the expressed dissatisfaction of the President I considered undeserved censure, and asked to be immediately relieved. In reply he said it was not intended to censure me, but only to spur me on to an active pursuit, and that it was not deemed sufficient cause for relieving me. For
r, Wm. D., I, 294, 295; II, 26, 48, 52, 53, 69, 108, 129, 383. Pendleton, Mr., II, 150. Pennsylvania Reserves, I, 255, 304, 307-310, 313, 315, 337, 361, 388; II, 313-315. Penrose, Dr., I, 224. Penrose, Wm. M., I, 224. Perkins, Lieut., II, 394. Perrin, A., II, 52, 53. Perry, Com., I, 159. Perry, M. C., I, 192. Peters, Richard, I, 3. Petersburg, mine explosion, July 30, 1864, II, 217, 218, 266, 267, 345-349. Petersburg, siege of, 1864-1865, II, 204-269. Pettigrew, J. J., II, 25, 47, 49, 52, 69, 134. Peyton, Bailie, I, 90, 96, 139, 140. Phillips, Charles A., II, 80. Pickett, George E., I, 196, 288, 289, 294; II, 25, 26, 60, 69, 100, 105, 108, 109, 328. Pillow, Gideon J., I, 319. Pineo, Surgeon, I, 350. Pleasonton, Alfred, I, 196, 383, 384, 386, 389; II, 8, 53, 71, 125, 148, 176, 182, 185, 321, 340, 369, 383, 389, 396, 397, 404-406, 409, 413, 422. Poe, Orlando M., I, 212, 271, 324. Polk, James K., I, 61, 65, 102, 103, 109, 111, 11