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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 62 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for J. J. Pettigrew or search for J. J. Pettigrew in all documents.

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vere loss, but, in the short struggle, Gen. J. J. Pettigrew, of North Carolina was mortally wounded. At the beginning of the melee, says Captain Graham, General Pettigrew's horse, frightened by the sudden and near discharge of musketry, plunged and threw his rider. Rising in great pain, for he was still suffering from his wound received at Seven Pines, and his arm was in a sling from his injury of the 3d of July, Pettigrew beheld a Federal corporal near him in the act of firing on his men. Drawing his pistol, he was approaching this soldier with a view of engaging in combat with him, when he fell to the ground, himself pierced with a pistol ball. New Bern Memorial Address General Pettigrew graduated at the university of North Carolina with brilliant honors, cultivated his mind in America and Europe, and was easily one of the ablest men in his State. He commenced his career as the colonel of the Twelfth, afterward the Twenty-second, regiment. His attainments as a man and