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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 45 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 8 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 12 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 23 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pettigrew or search for Pettigrew in all documents.

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t his lines. In December last, he marched against Kinston, and on the fourteenth defeated the enemy and captured the place. He then moved up the south side of the Neuse River to Goldsboro, burned the railroad bridge at that place, and tore up much of the railroad between the river and Mount Olive. He captured four hundred and ninety-six prisoners and nine pieces of artillery. His loss was ninety killed, four hundred and seventy-eight wounded, and nine missing. In March, the rebel General Pettigrew, with a large force of infantry and artillery, made a demonstration on Newbern, but was forced to abandon the attempt on that place. General Foster's loss was only two killed and four wounded. In April, General Hill laid siege to Washington, on Tar River. The place had only a small garrison, and was but slightly fortified. General Foster, however, immediately directed all his energies to strengthen the works so as to resist any assault till reinforcements arrived from Newbern, to ra