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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 45 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 8 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 12 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 23 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 12, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pettigrew or search for Pettigrew in all documents.

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suspended. Fort Sumter. While the engagement lasted, no demonstration whatever was made by the command in possession of the frowning fortress — Sumter — except the opening of the port-holes and running out of the guns which bear upon Morris' Island and Moultrie. Major Anderson, however, prudently forbore to fire, and no doubt experienced great relief when he saw the vessel steaming out of the harbor. The feeling at Castle Pinckney. At Castle Pinckney, under command of Col. Pettigrew, the ardor of the men knew no bounds. The greatest eagerness was shown by all to have a shot at the stranger, with the intention of bringing out the fire of Fort Sumter. The guns of the Castle were all manned simply upon the spontaneous movement of the men themselves. Each sprang to his post, without command of the officer in change. It was with the greatest difficulty than he could restrain them from firing; and it was not until a peremptory order to that effect was given that they