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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Peyton or search for Charles S. Peyton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Garnett's brigade at Gettysburg. (search)
lastly Hunton's) in the battle of Gettysburg. I am not sure who is the author of the report, as it is unsigned, but am under the impression that Lieutenant-Colonel Charles S. Peyton, of the Nineteenth Virginia infantry, wrote or dictated it. Colonel Peyton (at that time Major of the Nineteenth Virginia) was the senior field offColonel Peyton (at that time Major of the Nineteenth Virginia) was the senior field officer who escaped from the charge on Cemetery Hill and took command of the brigade after the battle. Colonel Henry Gantt was badly wounded in two places, and Lieutenant-Colonel Ellis was killed, as is reported in these papers. Major Peyton was afterwads promoted to the vacant lieutenant-colonelcy. He had lost an arm at second MaMajor Peyton was afterwads promoted to the vacant lieutenant-colonelcy. He had lost an arm at second Manassas, but returned to duty as soon as he was sufficiently recovered to do so, and did good service during the charge at Gettysburg. He was slightly wounded in the leg, but not disabled to such an extent as to prevent taking command of the brigade. I was Adjutant of the Nineteenth Virginia during the greater part of the war,