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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 56 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 17 3 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist. You can also browse the collection for Amos A. Phelps or search for Amos A. Phelps in all documents.

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Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 7: master strokes. (search)
eaf [Simon] also, will cordially come in, and I need not say he is one of the first [men] in the State, for his character is known. This quotation is made from a letter of General Samuel Fessenden, of Portland, Me., to Mr. Garrison, dated December 14. 1832. Among the remarkable minds which the Thoughts disillusioned in respect of the character and tendency of the Colonization Society were Theodore D. Weld, Elizur Wright, and Beriah Green, N. P. Rogers, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Amos A. Phelps, Lewis Tappan, and James Miller McKim. Garrison's assertion that the overthrow of the Colonization Society was the overthrow of slavery itself, was, from the standpoint of a student of history, an exaggerated one. We know now that the claim was not founded on fact, that while they did stand together they did not fall together. But the position was, nevertheless, the strongest possible one for the anti-slavery movement to occupy at the time. In the disposition of the pro-slavery for
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 10: between the acts. (search)
t principles are immutable. By his principles, therefore he would, be judged. Whittier, for instance,, he continues, is highly poetical, exuberant, and beautiful. Stuart is solemn, pungent, and severe. Wright is a thorough logician, dextrous, transparent, straightforward. Beriah Green is manly, eloquent, vigorous, devotional. May is persuasive, zealous, overflowing with the milk of human kindness. Cox is diffusive, sanguine, magnificent, grand. Bourne thunders and lightens. Phelps is one great, clear, infallible argumentdemonstration itself. Jocelyn is full of heavenlymindedness, and feels and speaks and acts with a zeal according to knowledge. Follen is chaste, profound, and elaborately polished. Goodell is perceptive, analytical, expert, and solid. Child (David L.) is generously indignant, courageous, and demonstrative; his lady combines strength with beauty, argumentation with persuasiveness, greatness with humility. Birney is collected, courteous, dispassiona
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 14: brotherly love fails, and ideas abound. (search)
Grimke were letting into the social establishment, by itinerating in the character of public lecturers and teachers. Amos A. Phelps was quite as strongly opposed to women preachers, to women assuming the place and tone of man as a public reformer, as and performing the duties of rational and responsible beings, for the sake of quieting tender consciences, like that of Phelps, among the anti-slavery brethren. They were in earnest and demanded to know whether there is such a thing as male and fecession from the society, which made a stir at the time. For among the seceding members was no less a personage than Amos A. Phelps, who was the general agent of the Massachusetts Society, and therefore one of Garrison's stanchest supporters. The r come directly afterward to high words and thumping blows. The love of David and Jonathan which once united Garrison and Phelps, has died. Garrison and Stanton meet and only exchange civilities. They, too, have become completely alienated, and so
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Index. (search)
90, Mott, Lucretia, 178,259, 292, 293. National Intelligencer, 28. New England Anti-Slavery Society, 137-141, 200, 280, 311. New England Spectator, 282. Newman, Prof. Francis W., 378. O'Connell, Daniel, 154, 170, 171, 304. Otis, Harrison Gray, 35,129, 30, 131, 213, 214, 215. Palmer, Daniel, 1. Palmer, Mary, 11, 12. Parker, Mary S., 222, 234, Parker, Theodore, 121,349,350, 362. Pastoral Letter, 277. Paxton, Rev. J. D., 186. Pease, Elizabeth, 303, 331, 346. Pennsylvania Hall, 257-260. Phelps, Amos A., 149, 186, 203,278,280, 288. Phillips Academy (Andover), 190. Phillips, Ann Green, 292, 293. Phillips, Wendell, 190, 257, 310, 317, 323, 3-6, 344, 346-347, 349, 351, 386,387, 388, 393,394. Pillsbury, Parker, 310, Prentice, George D., 120. Purvis, Robert, 144, 162, 178. Quincy, Edmund, 299, 310, 316, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327-329. Quincy, Josiah, 347. Rankin, John, 177. Remond, Charles Lenox, 293, 295, 304. Rhett, Barnwell, 338. Rogers, Nathaniel P., 149, 293, 295, 301. R