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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut tract, the (search)
Connecticut tract, the Grants by the English crown to New York and Massachusetts overlapped. In 1786 a convention of commissioners from the two colonies was held at Hartford, Conn.; Massachusetts ceded to the State of New York all that territory lying west of the present eastern boundary of New York, and New York ceded to Massachusetts a tract of territory running from the northern boundary of Pennsylvania due north through Seneca Lake to Lake Ontario, with the exception of a strip of land one mile wide on Niagara River—about 6,000,000 acres in all. Of this M. Gorham and O. Phelps bought the title of the Indians, and also the title of Massachusetts to 2,600,000 acres. Robert Morris purchased most of the remainder and sold a part of it to Sir William Pultney. He sold another large portion to the Holland Company and to the State of Connecticu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorham, Nathaniel 1738-1796 (search)
Gorham, Nathaniel 1738-1796 Statesman; born in Charlestown, Mass., May 27, 1738; took an active part in public affairs at the beginning of the Revolution, especially in the local affairs of Massachusetts; was a delegate to the Continental Congress (1782-83 and from 1785 to 1787); and was chosen its president in June, 1786. He was an influential member of the convention that framed the national Constitution, and exerted great power in procuring its ratification by Massachusetts. In conjunction with Oliver Phelps, he purchased an immense tract of land in the State of New York. He died in Charlestown, June 11, 1796. See Holland land Company.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holland land Company. (search)
Holland land Company. The tract of land ceded by the State of New York to the State of Massachusetts in 1786 was sold by the latter State to Oliver Phelps and Nathaniel Gorham for $1,000,000. They soon afterwards extinguished the Indian title to a part of this territory, surveyed it into tracts denominated ranges and townships, and sold large parcels to speculators and actual settlers. In 1790 they sold nearly the whole of the residue of the survey (1,204,000 acres) to Robert Morris, of Philadelphia, for 8d. an acre, who resold it to Sir William Pulteney. Phelps and Gorham, being unable to fulfil their contract in full with Massachusetts, compromised and surrendered that portion of the land to which the Indian title was unextinguished, in consideration of which the State relinquished two-thirds of the contract price. In 1796 Robert Morris purchased from the State this portion also, extinguished the Indian title, sold off several large tracts upon the east side of and along t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunter, David 1802-1886 (search)
f the South. He commanded the Department of West Virginia in the summer of 1864, where he was active for a while. For his various services he was brevetted major-general in 1865. He was retired in 1866, and died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 2, 1886. In the spring of 1862 General Hunter was in command of the Department of the South. He declared martial law in his department. Giving a free interpretation to his instructions from the War Department, he took measures for organizing regiments of negro troops; and to facilitate the business of recruiting he issued a general order, April 25, 1862, which proclaimed the absolute freedom of all the slaves within his department, declaring that slavery and martial law, in a free country, are incompatible. This was a step too far in advance of public sentiment, then, and of the government policy of that period; so President Lincoln annulled the order, and President Davis outlawed Generals Hunter and Phelps. See emancipation proclamations.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason, Lowell 1792-1872 (search)
Mason, Lowell 1792-1872 Composer; born in Medfield, Mass., Jan. 8, 1792; at an early age became a teacher and composer of music, and at the age of twenty years went to Savannah, Ga., where he gave instruction and led choirs and musical associations. In 1821 he published in Boston his Handel and Haydn collection of Church Music, which was so successful that he returned north and settled in Boston, where, in 1827, he began the instruction of classes in vocal music. He taught juvenile classes gratuitously on the Pestalozzian system, and published many collections of music, glee-books, etc. In connection with Professors Park and Phelps, he complied a Collection of Psalms and hymns for public worship, published in 1858. He died in Orange, N. J., Aug. 11, 1872.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phelps, Oliver 1749-1809 (search)
Phelps, Oliver 1749-1809 Jurist; born in Windsor, Conn., in 1749; was a successful merchant, and during the Revolutionary War was in the Massachusetts commissary department. In 1788 he, with Nathaniel Gorham, purchased a large tract of land (2,200,000 acres) in the State of New York, and at Canandaigua opened the first land-office established in America. In 1795 he and William Hart bought the Connecticut Western Reserve, in Ohio, comprising 3,300,000 acres. Mr. Phelps afterwards settled w he, with Nathaniel Gorham, purchased a large tract of land (2,200,000 acres) in the State of New York, and at Canandaigua opened the first land-office established in America. In 1795 he and William Hart bought the Connecticut Western Reserve, in Ohio, comprising 3,300,000 acres. Mr. Phelps afterwards settled with his family at Canandaigua, then a wilderness; represented that district in Congress from 1803 to 1805; and was judge of a circuit court. He died in Canandaigua, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1809.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
ew York......Oct. 27, 1787 Doctors' mob, caused by the discovery of human remains for dissection in the hospital in New York City......April 13, 14, 1788 Oliver Phelps and Nathaniel Gorham purchase of the Six Nations 2,500,000 acres in western New York......1788 New York ratifies the Constitution of the United States......as administered by Chancellor Livingston in the balcony of the City Hall.] First recorded party contest in New York State; votes polled, 12,453......1789 Oliver Phelps opens in Canandaigua the first private land office in America......1789 United States buys of Stephen Moore the site of West Point......1790 Population ohat is, from Jan. 11, 1785, to Oct. 21, 1788. Also the first and second sessions of the First Congress under the Constitution......March 4, 1789–Aug. 12, 1790 Phelps & Gorham sell to Robert Morris 1,204,000 acres in western New York for 8d. an acre......1 790 Boundary between New York and Vermont established......1790 Co